SPECIAL OCCASION - Mayor Steve Christie speaks at the Lacombe Cenotaph designation ceremony held this past Saturday evening. Lantry Vaughan photo

Lacombe Cenotaph designated as a Municipal Historic Resource

The Cenotaph to be an evolving war memorial, with names added as required

Mayor Steve Christie joined representatives from the Lacombe Heritage Resources Committee, the Lacombe & District Historical Society and the Royal Canadian Legion Lacombe Branch No. 79 on Sept. 30th for a special ceremony to designate the Lacombe Cenotaph as a municipal historic resource.

“The Lacombe Cenotaph is an important historic resource because it reminds us of the true cost of freedom,” said Mayor Steve Christie.

“Each name engraved on the monument represents a life cut too short and a family suffering the loss of a loved one. The Cenotaph will continue to serve as a reminder to future generations that freedom comes at a price and that those who fought for it deserve our admiration, reverence, and gratitude.”

The Lacombe Cenotaph is located in Lest We Forget Park, at the corner of 50th Ave. and 53rd St. in the heart of Lacombe’s historic downtown. The cenotaph was erected in 1924 by the Lest We Forget Club as a memorial to honour the citizens of Lacombe who gave their lives in the Great War (1914-1918). The park was donated to the City of Lacombe in 1955.

“Heritage preservation is important to the culture and identity of Lacombe,” said City of Lacombe Heritage Resources Committee Administrator Jennifer Kirchner. “We are ensuring that the stories of our citizens continue to be a part of our community memory through the preservation of important buildings and monuments such as the Lacombe Cenotaph.”

The Lacombe Cenotaph is comprised of a marble obelisk in the form of a solider with his weapon at ease. The monument is inscribed with the words ‘To the Glory of God. The Honour of the Armies of the Empire and in Proud Memory of our Dead who Fell in the Great War 1914-1918 and Whose Names are Here Recorded.’

Subsequent additions have been made to the Cenotaph to reflect the sacrifices of the Lacombe citizens during World War II, the Korean War, and the war in Afghanistan.

The intent is for the Cenotaph to be an evolving war memorial, with names added as required.

-Weber

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