N.L. warns of exodus of oil and gas industry without more federal help

N.L. warns of exodus of oil and gas industry without more federal help

N.L. warns of exodus of oil and gas industry without more federal help

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. — Newfoundland and Labrador’s government is looking for a rapid answer from Ottawa on its request for aid for the offshore oil sector in light of a quickening exodus of exploration rigs from the province.

Premier Dwight Ball, Natural Resouces Minister Siobhan Coady and industry leaders held a news conference Tuesday to repeat earlier warnings that hydrocarbon projects could be permanently lost to the province without a commitment from Ottawa.

Ball and Coady repeatedly warned that as each week passes, companies are closing and jobs are being lost.

The global COVID-19 pandemic and plummeting world oil prices have been causing problems for the East Coast industry.

In mid-March, Equinor and Husky Energy announced the decision to defer the Bay du Nord offshore development project due to falling oil prices and the economic downturn as countries respond to the novel coronavirus.

In addition, Hibernia has recently suspended its drilling program, the Terra Nova refit for May has been suspended and the West White Rose project has been deferred.

“Time may not be our friend,” the premier during Tuesday’s event..

The Newfoundland and Labrador Oil and Gas Industries Association, or NOIA, has said in order to remain competitive with Norway, the United Kingdom and Australia, the federal government needs to provide a renewed program of ”incentives for offshore exploration.”

The province is backing many of the industry proposals, noting the offshore industry accounts for close to one third of the province’s GDP, 13 per cent of wages and 10 per cent of all jobs.

Coady noted in an April 20 letter to federal Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan that the province appreciated a $75 million allocation to help its industry reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it needs further assistance.

Coady wrote that the province needs a program similar to Norway’s system of stimulating exploration through “direct tax payments.”

Her letter also called for a renewal of a regional tax credit program, and the introduction of 100 per cent deductibility of capital costs to encourage companies to continue with their exploration plans.

Charlene Johnson, the chief executive of NOIA, said during Tuesday’s news conference that there are three drilling rigs in Bay Bulls, N.L., and the industry is hoping they will remain there, rather than being shifted to other jurisdictions.

“It’s a real toss-up because the minute Norway approves (incentives), it’s going to be very hard to entice them to stay in our waters,” she said.

“These decisions are being made now. We’ve had over a dozen companies end their membership in NOIA because they’re closing up shop here.”

O’Regan, who is also the MP for St. John’s South, said in a tweet on Tuesday that he’d been in discussion with Johnson regarding the growing anxiety in the offshore sector.

“We all have friends and family who are worried about their jobs. Oil and gas is in a state of upheaval out West, and around the world. But I am a champion of our offshore. Together we will get through this.”

Ottawa has been offering programs to help companies with liquidity problems during the pandemic.

Federal agencies last month announced commercial loans, ranging in size from $15 million to $60 million each, to fund cash flow needs for a year for companies that had shown themselves to be financially viable prior to the pandemic.

A spokesman for O’Regan’s office said these kinds of programs have helped provide liquidity to the small and medium-sized players in the industry.

In addition, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy program covers up to 75 per cent of an employee’s wages for an employer, and can be applied to oil and gas firms, O’Regan office noted.

— by Michael Tutton in Halifax.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 26, 2020.

The Canadian Press

crude oil

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta has 3,651 active cases of COVID-19.  (File photo)
750 new COVID-19 cases identified in Alberta Sunday

Central zone currently has 1,182 active cases of the virus

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine deliveres to Canada are being delayed because of complications at their European distribution facility. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Delays of Pfizer vaccine delivery to impact Alberta’s vaccination plans

Alberta has administered 74,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine so far

Alberta Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Deena Hinshaw
Alberta eases some COVID-19 restrictions

Salons, barbershops and other personal and wellness services will be open by appointment only

A scene from “Canada and the Gulf War: In their own words,” a video by The Memory Project, a program of Historica Canada, is shown in this undated illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Historica Canada
New video marks Canada’s contributions to first Gulf War on 30th anniversary

Veterans Affairs Canada says around 4,500 Canadian military personnel served during the war

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on December 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
No place for ‘far right’ in Conservative Party, Erin O’Toole says

O’Toole condemned the Capitol attack as ‘horrifying’ and sought to distance himself and the Tories from Trumpism

A passer by walks in High Park, in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. This workweek will kick off with what’s fabled to be the most depressing day of the year, during one of the darkest eras in recent history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
‘Blue Monday’ getting you down? Exercise may be the cure, say experts

Many jurisdictions are tightening restrictions to curb soaring COVID-19 case counts

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
COVID-19: Provinces work on revised plans as Pfizer-BioNTech shipments to slow down

Anita Anand said she understands and shares Canadians’ concerns about the drug company’s decision

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials say country will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

(Via the Canadian Press)
Alberta monolith comes with message to save eastern slopes of Rocky Mountains

‘They deserve our attention. They warrant our protection. They are under threat’

blessing
Bentley Blessing Pantry continues to faithfully serve the community

‘We just wanted to make everyone aware that we are still here to serve you throughout this coming year.’

A Suncor logo is shown at the company’s annual meeting in Calgary on May 2, 2019. A worker is missing after a dozer broke through ice on an inactive Suncor tailings pond in northern Alberta.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Worker missing after dozer breaks through frozen tailings pond in northern Alberta

The worker was an employee of Christina River Construction

File Photo
‘You took away some real joy,’ Sylvan Lake Winter Village turned off after vandalism

Sometime during the night of Jan, 12 the light display at the pier was vandalized and damaged

Most Read