FOUNDING FATHER – Principal Denis Cote

Local school celebrates Father Lacombe Day

The life and influence of Albert Lacombe, also known as Father Lacombe, was celebrated by the school

The life and influence of Albert Lacombe, also known as Father Lacombe, was celebrated by the school named after the French-Canadian Catholic missionary last Friday.

Students at Father Lacombe Catholic School in Lacombe celebrated the significant man through a day full of activities on Feb. 27th.

Father Lacombe, who lived from 1827 to 1916, lived among the Cree people and visited the Blackfoot First Nations in western Canada. He is remembered for having brought peace to the two First Nations and assisting with negotiations between the Blackfoot and the Canadian Pacific Railway.

“Father Albert Lacombe was the founder of the developed west and started Catholic schools to bring Christ to the First Nations people,” said Father Lacombe Catholic School Principal Denis Cote.

“He really brought peace to the west and it’s important for us to take time to celebrate. He’s our namesake.”

Cote added it was very rewarding for the students to experience the day and to bring the Catholic presence to the school.

The City of St. Albert was founded in 1861 by Father Lacombe as well as the City of Lacombe is also named in his honour.

Throughout the day, the students dressed up as either Father Albert Lacombe or as someone who may have lived during the time period when Father Lacombe was ministering.

First Nations ancestry was a main the focus of the day as well, with Métis storyteller Denise Miller engaging the students in a traditional drum song, a Cree story and the history of Father Albert Lacombe.

Miller told the students about the original people of Canada, the First Nations. She also said Father Albert Lacombe had two nicknames given to him from the First Nations people, ‘good heart’ and ‘the noble soul.’

Father Albert Lacombe was born in Saint-Sulpice on Feb. 28, 1827. His grandmother was Ojibwe, making him Métis, said Miller.

“He was the first priest to come to the prairies,” she said. “He opened the first flour mill. He did a lot of firsts.”

According to Alberta Culture and Tourism, Lacombe’s overall accomplishments are staggering.

“He established First Nation missions, served numerous Roman Catholic parishes, and founded new settlements. He mastered several First Nation languages and published dictionaries and prayer books in these dialects.

“During the upheavals of the 1880s, Father Lacombe was a peacemaker, resolving disputes between Aboriginals and the federal government and Canadian Pacific Railway.

“He (also) established the Lacombe Home in Midnapore and recruited the Sisters of Providence to administer care for the sick, the poor, and the aged at the site. Lacombe coordinated the construction of bridges and grist mills, of schools and churches.”

During the celebration last week, students also had the chance to make their own bannock, a traditional flat bread often consumed by First Nation’s people.

Feb. 28th marked the 188th anniversary of Lacombe’s birth as well.

news@lacombeexpress.com

 

Just Posted

Lacombe teacher receives Prime Minister’s Award

Schultz will be celebrated at an awards ceremony with the Prime Minister on May 28th in Ottawa

Lacombe Police Service arrests two in possession of stolen property, cocaine, meth

LPS notified of a stolen trailer stolen from the Lacombe area for sale on a local sales site.

Lacombe Police Services arrests car thief in possession of meth

Red Deer woman’s outstanding warrants lead to arrest

Lacombe Police Service warns of gold/jewelry scammers

The gold/jewelry presented turns out to be fake

VIDEO: LCHS Hair Massacure supports children’s charities

Event supports kids living with cancer

Ottawa spending $24.5M to research on health benefits, risks of pot use

$390,000 will fund two cannabis public awareness

Crackdown on money laundering does not include federal public inquiry: minister

An independent report commissioned concluded $7.4 billion was laundered in B.C. last year

Trudeau’s action plan on climate change brings B.C. politician out of retirement

Terry Lake, a former B.C. health minister, is running for federal office in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo

Survey finds minimal progress in Canadian military’s fight against sexual misconduct

1.6 per cent of regular-force members — 900 military personnel — reported having been victims of sexual assaults over past year

Body of missing snowmobiler recovered from Great Slave Lake

Police confirm the body is that of one of three missing snowmobilers

Is vegan food a human right? Ontario firefighter battling B.C. blaze argues it is

Adam Knauff says he had to go hungry some days because there was no vegan food

Winds helping in battle against fire threatening northern Alberta town

Nearly 5,000 people have cleared out of High Level and nearby First Nation

Federal government funds millions to help B.C. police spot drugged driving

Many police departments have expressed wariness about using the only government-approved roadside test

Most Read