Woman shares story of living with schizophrenia

The Open Hearts and Minds Walk is set for Sept. 13th in Red Deer

PAMELA TRUFYN

Pamela Trufyn experienced her first psychosis at a very young age with little to no understanding of what a schizo-affective disorder could even mean – all she knew was that she was scared and confused.

From 1996 to 2010, Trufyn experienced multiple diagnoses and symptoms ranging from depression to hallucinations to elated, anxious habits to a heavy – sometimes paralyzing – fear of causing people around her pain. It wasn’t until 2010 that she was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder and began to reap the benefits of a chemically balanced brain.

“Schizo means split – that doesn’t mean split personality. It means I’m split between positive and negative symptoms of psychosis,” explained Trufyn.

“The affective part of that means that I have a mood disorder. I come up and I’m pretty good but when I come down it’s like I’m crashing into a very deep depression.”

Schizophrenia is a brain disorder that is not completely understood much like many brain disorders. There are varying degrees, forms and factors that come into play with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (or related diagnoses). Symptoms are classified as being positive, negative or cognitive.

Positive symptoms are things can be seen or heard and can be described as something that a person without a disorder would not have. The most common example is auditory hallucination. Negative symptoms are things that are lacking in a person with schizophrenia that would not be lacking from a healthy brain. An example is having no tone or facial expression while speaking.

A person can show signs of positive and negative or even cognitive symptoms, which give them a ‘split’ diagnosis, explained Trufyn.

“I didn’t realize I was sick. My parents saw me doing things that I wouldn’t normally do if I were well. Examples were that I wasn’t eating because I thought I’d have to pay for everything I ate. There were so many different things going on in my mind – like I’d have to pay for everything I consumed and I didn’t have that money, or that I was being prepared for a celebration.

“My mind gets full. I heard about the disaster in Haiti and thought it was my fault because I was evil. When I’m in a state of psychosis, I feel like anything bad in the world is my fault.”

Trufyn grew up battling bouts of depression and trying to carry herself through stages of psychosis. She talked about being obsessed with religion and religious ‘signs’ and going off of her medication because she thought she was doing well. Trufyn said she make attempts at taking her own life before she was comfortable telling her doctor about some of the more major symptoms and thoughts she was having, which ultimately led to her successful diagnosis.

“From 1996 to 2014, there has been a lot that’s happened but I’ve realized I’m a person who lives with a diagnosis of schizo-affective disorder and experiences these things. I started at the society (Schizophrenia Society of Alberta) as a volunteer and people understood me. They saw things in me that I couldn’t see for myself – things that I was good at,” smiled Trufyn.

“I’m good at talking with people here and sharing in their lives. I was offered this position with peer support. Through talking to people in our groups, I saw that I shared experiences with (other people with similar diagnoses) too, and maybe this is an illness that other people experience too and it’s not a fault of my own.”

Last year, she attended the Open Hearts and Minds Walk (presented by the Schizophrenia Society) for the first time. It will take place again this year on Sept. 13th at Mackenzie Trail in Red Deer. The goal, Trufyn explained, is to get out and meet people who live with this diagnosis, and show support for them in their struggles.

The walk is free and includes a breakfast and a silent auction. For more, call Judy at 403-342-5760.

kmendonsa@lacombeexpress.com

 

Just Posted

PHOTOS: Alberta male team takes silver in Winter Games relay speed skating

Alberta was close behind Quebec in the team relay speed skating finals

Lacombe Police Service respond to car theft at Greenway Inn

Suspect is still outstanding and the investigation is ongoing

Lacombe Police Service responds to attempted car theft

Two suspects departed scene in a silver 2000 Dodge Caravan

Alberta was crowned champions in Wheelchair Basketball at Canada Winter Games

Ontario won silver while Quebec took home the bronze medal

Lacombe welcomes ‘Napalm Girl’ to discuss journey from hatred to forgiveness

Latest Herr Lecture to feature Kim Phuc Phan Thi at LMC

WATCH: Canada Games Torch Relay lights spark in Lacombe

100s brave blistering cold to support local torchbearers

WATCH: Pet therapy brings calmness to Winter Games athletes

Canada Winter Games in Red Deer continue on until March 2nd

R. Kelly charged with 10 counts of sexual abuse

R&B star has been accused of sexual misconduct involving women and underage girls for years

Child advocacy centre raising funds through Dream Home Lottery

The child advocacy centre in Red Deer uses its resources to help kids all over Central Alberta

Trudeau tells Canadians to listen to clerk in SNC-Lavalin matter

Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick delivered a blunt assessment at the House of Commons justice

Mueller report looming, new attorney general in hot seat

Robert Mueller is required to produce a confidential report to pursue or decline prosecutions

B.C. woman shares story of abuse with church officials ahead of Vatican summit

Leona Huggins was the only Canadian in the gathering ahead of a historic summit at the Vatican

Sylvan Lake’s Megan Cressey misses Freestyle Skiing Big Air podium

Alberta’s Jake Sandstorm captured silver in the men Freestyle Skiing Big Air contest

Why do zebras have stripes? Perhaps to dazzle away flies

Researchers from University of Bristol look into why zebras have stripes

Most Read