POLISHED - A cappella group Cadence set to perform at Victory Church this month.

POLISHED - A cappella group Cadence set to perform at Victory Church this month.

A cappella group Cadence to make Red Deer appearance

Described as Canada’s premiere vocal group, Toronto-based Cadence performs in Red Deer Dec. 13th

Described as Canada’s premiere vocal group, Toronto-based Cadence performs in Red Deer Dec. 13th at Victory Church (98 Oberlin Ave). Show time is 7:30 p.m.

This a cappella ensemble has been wowing audiences across the country and around the world for nearly 20 years.

Whether performing at sold-out jazz clubs and concert halls, at music festivals, for educational outreach, or for corporate functions, the members of Cadence bring an infectious energy and uncanny verve to every song they sing.

The band is made up of David Lane (baritone and bass), Ross Lynde (tenor), Lucas Marchand (tenor) and Kurt Sampson (bass and vocal percussion). They each bring many years of training and performance experience to create a rich musical event appropriate for all ages.

“I’m pretty excited to be performing in Red Deer. It’ll be the first time a lot of my friends and family will get to see me do my thing,” said Lane, who is originally from Red Deer.

He added this show is important to him because it brings him back to his roots of jazz choir at Lindsay Thurber Comprehensive High School.

“We’re doing the show with the Lindsay Thurber Jazz Choir. We’re going to do a clinic/workshop event with them during the day and then they are going to come to the show and sing at least one song with us, maybe two, and probably a couple on their own,” he said.

“I sang in that jazz choir when I was in high school. When I was in high school in that choir, we were listening to Cadence, the group I’m in now. We’d listen to them and were really excited about their music. It’s pretty cool that I sing with these guys now and we’re going back to do a show with the Lindsay Thurber choir.”

Cadence has produced four critically acclaimed studio albums, Cool Yule (2011), Speak Easy (2010), Twenty for One (2005), and Frost Free (2000). They have won or been nominated for numerous awards, including three nods from the Juno Awards and 10 from CARA, the Contemporary A Cappella Recording Awards.

As the newest addition to Cadence, Lane said he has thoroughly enjoyed getting to take part in the group he once admired as a teen.

“When I first joined, I was in this crazy sort of honeymoon stage, where I was like, ‘Oh my god I’m singing with this group that I idolized in high school’. I was really nervous to even meet them the first time when I went to audition,” Lane laughed.

“Over time, that’s kind of just transitioned into feeling very fortunate that I get to make music with these guys. They’re a very talented group and it’s been really awesome performing with them.”

Cadence’s live shows are always a hit. They feature a hypnotic blend of complex harmonies, intricate arrangements, vocal dexterity and just plain fun. Onstage antics and audience participation are par for the course at any Cadence show, but so too is a mesmerizing display of musical genius.

The group recently returned from Europe, where they performed in Germany, Slovakia and Italy. The group tours far and wide, but Lane says they are looking to create more of a presence in Alberta. Lane said he enjoys being able to travel and perform, learning about the industry as he goes.

“I think the biggest thing I’ve learned from being in the group so far is all of the stuff that goes on behind the scenes that doesn’t have to do with the music specifically,” he said. “I’ve learned a lot about music business booking gigs, setting things up, making connections with people all of that stuff that I didn’t really have an insider’s view of before.”

He added it’s a big deal for him to be able to perform with his old high school group in his hometown for friends and family. Cadence’s members hail from all across Canada, but Lane said they always try to incorporate local music into their performances abroad.

“We’re from different places but we all have a similar education and musical background. We’re all into jazz music and use that, as well as some folk and pop music. When we were in Taiwan, we did this hilarious clubbing song a Top 40, dance, Taiwan pop song. We just did a little piece of it maybe 30 seconds and people went crazy every time,” he laughed.

The group performs with chemistry and energy, making their live performances memorable and enjoyable for the audience. The members are each extremely talented and well trained. Their vocal abilities blend and compliment each other to create a unique, powerful sound.

Lane said they would love to sell out and that he’d like to see some familiar faces at the event. It is rare for the group to perform in Alberta, making this particular show quite meaningful to him.

“We’re hoping to establish more of a standing in Alberta so that we can come out there more often. We go to B.C. usually once a year, but don’t really go to Alberta much,” he said.

This world-renowned a capella group will hit Red Deer for one night only for a memorable performance at Victory Church. For tickets, visit cadence-unplugged.com/tour-schedule.

kmendonsa@reddeerexpress.com

 

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