Enjoy a trip down memory lane with Mickey Gilley

Legend plays the Memorial Centre in Red Deer on March 9th

SUCCESSFUL PATH – Country singer Mickey Gilley brings his decades’ worth of hits to Red Deer on March 9th.

SUCCESSFUL PATH – Country singer Mickey Gilley brings his decades’ worth of hits to Red Deer on March 9th.

For the first time in over 20 years, the original ‘urban cowboy’, Mickey Gilley, will be in concert in Canada in March of 2015.

He performs March 9th at the Memorial Centre with show time at 7 p.m.

The legendary singer has had seventeen number one singles in his long career including Room Full of Roses, City Lights, Fool for Love, Don’t the Girls Get Prettier at Closing Time and his remake of the soul standard Stand By Me.

It was Stand By Me from the blockbuster film Urban Cowboy in 1980 that catapulted Gilley from country to pop crossover superstar, taking him out of the shadow of his famous cousins Jerry Lee Lewis and Jimmy Swaggart.

As he shares with audiences his career in music and the stories behind the hit songs, it was the 70s that brought him most of his signature songs, awards and accolades.

He is the recipient of six Academy of Country Music Awards, from his first in 1974 – Top New Male Vocalist to Entertainer of the Year in 1976.

Gilley is also famous for his namesake nightclub with the legendary mechanical bull and was one of the first artists to open a theatre in Branson, Missouri.

On March 9th 1936, he was born in Natchez Mississippi.

Raised in Ferriday, Louisiana along with his two famous cousins, Lewis and Swaggart, it was there where his love and appreciation of music grew. He absorbed the haunting sounds of Louisiana rhythm and blues by sneaking up to the windows of the clubs at night.

Gilley learned to play piano at an early age but did not achieve the success of his cousin Jerry Lee until later.

Moving to Houston in the early 1950s to work construction, Gilley did not start playing until 1957 when he recorded his first record Ooh we Baby.

The song would later by used in a commercial for Yoplait yogurt. In 1959, he had his first charted record, Is it Wrong for Loving You? in which Kenny Rogers played the bass.

He continued playing in cities throughout the south but eventually settled into Pasadena where he began performing at the Nesadel Club. There he developed into one of the city’s most popular acts while playing there for more than 10 years. While at the Nesadel Galley, had his second charted record, Lonely Wine.

In 1971, along with business partner, Sherwood Cryer, he opened the world famous Gilley’s night club in Pasadena, Texas.

The club would grow and one day enter into the Guinness Record Book as the World’s largest honky-tonk. It was here that Gilley started experiencing his first success when he released Room Full of Roses. By the mid-seventies his songs were hitting the country charts with regularity.

As the eighties neared, Gilley was growing bigger with every day.

Country music’s biggest stars used the club as a launching pad. A television show was developed which only added to the phenomenon. But it was when Esquire Magazine caught wind of the excitement and featured an article called ‘The Ballad of the Urban Cowboy’ that caused Gilley to develop into an Urban Cowboy craze.

With the club rising in popularity so to did Gilley. To name a few of his many hits, City Lights, I Overlooked and Orchid and Don’t the Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time all reached number one on the Billboard Country Charts.

His success along with the attention of the Esquire article led Paramount Pictures to film a movie in 1979. The movie, Urban Cowboy, would star John Travolta and Debra Winger and predominately featured Gilley.

The soundtrack featured many popular artists including a huge hit by Gilley, Stand By Me which went platinum and it made him a household name.

Also on the album was the Orange Blossom Special performed by his Urban Cowboy Band, the song would earn a Grammy. He was also awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Gilley’s shut its doors however in the late eighties and a fire would later destroy the building. But Gilley did not let this discourage him. He took his show on the road and would eventually settle into Branson – a unique community tucked away in the Ozarks. In the 90s many artists such as Roy Clark, Johnny Cash, Ray Stevens, Box Car Willie were flocking to the area.

In 1989, Gilley decided to build his own theatre and his fans loved it. Then in 1993 the unthinkable happened, an electrical short in a neon sign located outside of the building created a spark and the theatre burned to the ground.

Gilley rebuilt and his career was blooming.

Then 2009 brought another tragedy. He tripped while helping his friends move a sofa and was paralyzed for three months. He could no longer play the piano, walking was difficult, but his voice was better than ever and family and fans kept encouraging him to perform.

Today Gilley ‘walks’ out on the stage unassisted and proceeds to sing his hits and share his musical career.

The show is full of stories, music, and tender moments. His number one love is his music, but he continues to give back to the community he lives in.

He recently received the Pioneer Award presented to him by the Branson Area Chamber of Commerce, he does two shows a year where the admittance is dog food and he gives the food to the local shelters. He participates in local benefits, veteran shows, and promotes Branson all over the United States.

For tickets, call the Black Knight Ticket Centre at 403-755-6626, 1-800-661-8793 or visit http://www.bkticketcentre.ca.

-Weber

 

Just Posted

Member Terry Parsons’ custom built track vehicle.
Forestburg’s Area 53 Racetrack gears up for action-packed season

Site will also host a portion of the ‘Miles of Mayhem’ event in July

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw reported five additional deaths Wednesday due to COVID-19. (File photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Red Deer at 169 active cases of COVID-19

Province set to move into Stage 2 of reopening Thursday

t
How to tell if a call from ‘CRA’ is legitimate or a scam

Expert says it’s important to verify you really are dealing with the CRA before you give out any info

Grade 12 students at Wetaskiwin Composite High School took place in the annual water fight off school property on June 11, 2021. Shaela Dansereau/ Pipestone Flyer.
Graduating students in Wetaskiwin throw water fight after being told it could result in suspension

Students were told their participation could result in them being barred from graduation ceremonies.

The arrest south of Winnipeg occurred before Bernier was to arrive at a protest in the city. (Twitter/Maxime Bernier)
Maxime Bernier arrested following anti-rules rallies in Manitoba: RCMP

He’s been charged with exceeding public gathering limits and violating Manitoba’s requirement to self-isolate

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives for the G7 Summit, at the airport in Newquay, United Kingdom, Thursday, June 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Details on Canada’s vaccine sharing plan coming Sunday, up to 100 million doses

Canada’s high commissioner to the UK says details will come after the G7 summit

Conservative MP Tom Kmiec waves to the crowd during the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Friday, July 8, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Newborn daughter’s death inspires MP’s bill on bereavement leave for parents

Conservative MP Tom Kmiec says a day or two off not enough for some grieving parents

Victoria’s 2020 Canada Day celebration will not happen this year. (Black Press Media file photo)
Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations backs cancelling Canada Day celebration

Statement made after Victoria cancels Canada Day event as a statement of reconciliation

United Nurses of Alberta is slamming Health Minister Tyler Shandro for suggesting staff vacations are causing emergency room problems. (Black Press Media files)
Physicians were suffering burnout and then the pandemic made it worse, UBC study finds

Burnout prevalent among 68 per cent of doctors – likely a reflection of issue globally, says researcher

Environment and Climate Change Minister Jonathan Wilkinson responds to a question during Question Period in the House of Commons Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020 in Ottawa. The federal government is bringing in a new coal policy saying new or expanded thermal coal mines create unacceptable environmental impacts.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
‘Unacceptable environmental effects:’ New federal policy restricts thermal coal

Policy puts another roadblock in front of Coalspur Mines and its Alberta Vista mine expansion

Kawasaki City Institute for Public Health Director General Nobuhiko Okabe speaks during a press conference after a roundtable on COVID-19 countermeasures at Tokyo 2020 Games in Tokyo, Friday, June 11, 2021. A group of experts participated in a third roundtable on COVID-19 countermeasures proposed for audience-related infection control. (Franck Robichon/Pool Photo via AP)
Tokyo Olympics still undecided on fans — or no fans at all

Fans from abroad already banned from what is shaping up to be a largely made-for-television event

Most Read