Singer Ryan Carnduff continues to make his mark on the local music scene via his unique and masterfully creative approach to his art.                                Jaydin Vonkeman photo

Singer Ryan Carnduff continues to make his mark on the local music scene via his unique and masterfully creative approach to his art. Jaydin Vonkeman photo

Red Deer singer Ryan Carnduff continues to carve out his own unique musical niche

Performances are being planned for September and into the fall

Red Deer singer Ryan Carnduff continues to carve out his own unique musical niche on the local musical landscape.

The gifted songwriter and performer has a remarkable way of connecting with audiences via his artistry and performance style, all the more strengthened by his warm and affable personality. He’s also been a two-time nominee for ‘Singer/Songwriter of the Year’ at the Red Deer Entertainment Awards.

“I’ve always loved music; I remember as a child dancing around the record collection,” he recalls during a recent chat. ”I also wanted to learn how to play the drums, but my parents got me into guitar lessons when I was eight – it was quieter, I think,” he added with a laugh.

For us listeners, it was indeed the right choice – Carnduff, who describes his tunes as falling largely in the folk vein, has a way with crafting music via his guitar that certainly leaves an impact.

His vocal skills are also striking, as are clearly reflected in tunes such as Waking Up, (Let Me) Take You Out and the gently engaging sensibilities of the aptly titled Quiet. I’m Letting Go also brings to light his ability to pen a compelling melody that provides a framework for a certain lyrical richness.

It’s hard to imagine these songs – which resonate so deeply with such authenticity and heart – being sung with any other voice. Carnduff’s clear vocals, powered by plenty of emotional depth, are the ideal means of conveying whatever message he is trying to get across to audiences.

That gift for singing kind of surfaced during the years he was studying guitar, so it’s no wonder the two meld so naturally together.

“I also took choir in high school and did some musical theatre as a kid. I also had a very brief time in a band once I graduated from high school but that didn’t stick,” he explained, adding he also ventured into the music program at Red Deer College, but things didn’t work out there as planned either.

It was becoming clear that Carnduff, who is a cook by day, had much to offer musically, but perhaps it was going to come about in a different kind of way; in his ‘own’ way and in his own time.

Over the following years his own family was growing, so family responsibility was becoming more front and centre.

But that didn’t mean the passion for music was fading from view.

“It wasn’t until about six years ago that a friend from high school who I hadn’t seen in years wanted to start jamming. So we were doing that, and it became a weekly thing. He said, ‘Let’s try doing this as an open mic type-of-thing and see where that goes, so we started doing that.”

‘Ryan and the Folkarounds’ featured Carnduff and Andrew Moseson, and proved to be a popular acoustic duo on the local circuit. “That was between 2012 and 2014,” he recalled.

That eventually faded, and so Carnduff, who was also born and raised in Red Deer, opted to venture out more and more as a solo artist.

It wasn’t a completely easy transition, as Carnduff describes himself as quite a shy person in general. But ultimately, there is just something about hitting the stage with his guitar that feels ‘like home’. Once he starts communicating with an audience, that nervous energy turns to only fuel his performance further.

Since those initial days, word of just what he brings audiences has been spreading, so these days he’s a pretty busy guy on the local musical circuit.

“The response has been really positive – it’s been phenomenal,” he said. “The music scene in Red Deer is great – people are so supportive of one another,” he added. “It’s a tight-knit community, and I love being a part of it. It’s really special.”

As to songwriting, Carnduff said he penned his first tune about five years ago.

The process for doing this shifts from time to time – ideas can pop up virtually any time.

Often, ideas come to him when he’s at work – not the most convenient of places when one is focused on other things in a hectic environment, he explained with a laugh. “I’ve lost dozens of really killer ideas that way,” he laughed.

“Ideas do just come to me. It can be a line, or a phrase,” he said, adding that melodies do however spring up initially sometimes as well. For a closer look at his works, check out ryancarnduff.bandcamp.com and reverbnation.com.

Looking ahead, he’s hoping to lay down some tracks this fall with local singer/songwriter Nathan Danser for another EP.

He’s also got a show at The Krossing slated for Sept. 7th. and is playing at the Velvet Olive on Sept. 8th.

“That’s actually the room I started out playing in six years ago, so it’s kind of nice to be returning.

“I love performing. I love getting a reaction from somebody, to see someone feel something from what I’m doing – that makes me know I must be doing something okay, and that is awesome.”

You can also find him on facebook at ‘Ryan Carnduff music’.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Cilantro and Chive Owner Rieley Kay (centre) and Guest Chef City Councillor Cara Hoekstra (right) hand over a donation of more than $1,000 to he Lacombe and District Historical Society, care of Executive Director Melissa Blunden at the Michener House Museum and Archives. (Photo Submitted)
Over $1,000 donated to Lacombe and District Historical Society

The donation came from the proceeds from the February Burger of the Month at Cilantro and Chive

File photo
Gov’t of Alberta identifies estimated 300 new COVID-19 cases Sunday

Online COVID-19 dashboard unavailable as upgrades being completed

COVID
Red Deer down to 313 active cases of COVID-19

Alberta reports an additional 411 COVID-19 cases

Seniors in the 65-unit Piper Creek Lodge are among those waiting for COVID-19 vaccinations. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Central Alberta senior lodges anxiously waiting for COVID-19 vaccinations

“Should be at the front of the line, not the back of the line”

(The Canadian Press)
‘Worse than Sept. 11, SARS and financial crisis combined’: Tourism industry in crisis

Travel services saw the biggest drop in active businesses with 31 per cent fewer firms operating

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Vaccine hesitancy decreases in B.C. as mass immunizations set to begin: poll

Two-thirds of British Columbians, and Canadians, would get the vaccine as soon as possible

A woman walks through Toronto’s financial district on Monday, July 30, 2018. A new poll suggests most Canadians believe there’s still a long way to go to achieve gender equality in this country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy
Canadians, especially women, say gender equality not achieved in Canada: Poll

Poll results themselves underscore the challenge, with more men believing equality had been achieved

This image provided by Harpo Productions shows Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, left, in conversation with Oprah Winfrey. (Joe Pugliese/Harpo Productions via AP)
Race, title and anguish: Meghan and Harry explain royal rift

Meghan said she struggled with concerns within the royal family about her son’s skin colour

Kiara Robillard is seen in an undated handout photo. When the pandemic began, Robillard had to rush back home to Alberta from California, where she had been living for five years, after she was struck by a truck that broke her spine in two places. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Kiara Robillard, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
‘It kind of clicks:’ Text4Hope program helps with depression, anxiety during pandemic

Participants receive one text message every morning for three months

Hockey hall-of-fame legend Wayne Gretzky, right, watches the casket of his father, Walter Gretzky, as it is carried from the church during a funeral service in Brantford, Ont., Saturday, March 6, 2021. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky remembered as a man with a ‘heart of gold’ at funeral

The famous hockey father died Thursday at age 82 after battling Parkinson’s disease

Supporters rally outside court as Pastor James Coates of GraceLife Church is in court to appeal bail conditions, after he was arrested for holding day services in violation of COVID-19 rules, in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday March 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
‘Law remains valid:’ Pastor accused of violating health orders to remain in jail

The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is representing the pastor

A decommissioned pumpjack is shown at a well head on an oil and gas installation near Cremona, Alta., Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016. The Alberta Energy Regulator says it is suspending all of the licences held by an oil and gas producer with more than 2,200 wells and 2,100 pipelines after it failed to bring its operations into compliance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta Energy Regulator suspends licences of oil and gas producer that owes $67M

The company is being asked to comply with past orders to clean up historic spills and contamination

Most Read