Warner Music Canada photo

Warner Music Canada photo

The Washboard Union heads to Westerner Days July 20th

Chris Duncombe talks latest record and the band’s road to success

Country group The Washboard Union is hitting the Westerner Days stage July 20th.

The Express got a chance to catch up with Chris Duncombe of the band to talk about their sophomore album What We’re Made Of and the success they’ve had over the years.

The new album, produced by Matt Rovey, who has done work for the Zac Brown Band and Dean Brody, was recorded partly in Nashville, Toronto and Vancouver with Jeff ‘Diesel’ Dalziel.

And its already seen great success, with the album’s first single, Shine as the band’s third Top Ten Country Radio hit, which they performed live on the Canadian Country Music Awards, walking away with a CCMA Award for 2017 Roots Artist of the Year.

“We wrote that song in Nashville with a good friend of ours from Australia and I remember coming out of the room after we wrote that song and it felt like we were floating above the floor,” said Duncombe with a laugh.

“What it said meant a lot to us.”

He added that they are lucky they get to spend a lot of time with their fans on the road, and Shine was a culmination of a bunch of people’s stories.

“Since its come out people have come back to us along the way and said that they have really connected with that song.”

One woman, in remission from stage four cancer, said Shine was her song while she was going through treatment.

“And we were sent a video of 60 or 70 kids from La Glace, Alberta who took it upon themselves to learn Shine in their music class and record it,” said Duncombe, adding that the group decided to go out and surprise the kids, performing it with them at their school.

“We’re so fortunate to have fans who really connect with our music and I think that there’s so many songs on this record that are the culmination of all those incredible stories from people we meet along the way.”

Having grown up in Kelowna, Duncombe and fellow band mate Aaron Grain have quite the story. Their parents started dating when they were around 13-years-old, making them step brothers!

“Aaron and I kind of grew up in the same house and got our drivers licences together and went to college together and dropped out of college together and we met David in Vancouver when we finally moved down there.”

David Roberts, fellow band mate, came into the picture when Grain and Duncombe made the move to Vancouver. There was a 1920’s Tudor-style mansion that a bunch of musicians took over. At any given time, there were around three different bands living in the house, Roberts being one of them.

Duncombe recalls that every Tuesday night, the guys would hang out in the basement studio, playing old trucker and bluegrass songs they knew as kids growing up.

“There was a washboard hanging on the wall and the washboard was always that percussion that families had when they couldn’t afford drums. It’s just such an engrained part of country music that it just seemed natural when David finally came up with the name. It just seemed to really fit us,” said Duncombe.

With their unique style of country tunes, the group has been able to set themselves apart, lending to their constant success in the country music world.

One of their highlights of the year was touring with Nashville superstars Old Dominion, along with getting to perform with the Zac Brown Band. The group was also asked to play The Bluebird Cafe and The Listening Room in Nashville, which Duncombe says, “As a songwriter, it’s something you really aspire to.”

He added, “We’ve played to some big crowds, much larger than we’ve ever played for in our lives and I’d say it’s all wrapped up in the fact that now people know our songs and they sing our songs,” said Duncombe.

“Sometimes I lose my place in the song watching people sing along to our songs because it still blows my mind every time it happens. I’d say as artists that’s been the greatest gift we’ve received.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta Health reported two new COVID-19 deaths in Red Deer Friday. (Image courtesy CDC)
Two more deaths linked to Olymel outbreak in Red Deer

Province reported 356 additional COVID-19 cases Friday

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks during a news conference in Edmonton on Feb. 24, 2020. It’s budget day in the province, and Kenney’s United Conservative government is promising more help in the fight against COVID, but more red ink on the bottom line. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Alberta’s budget promises more help for COVID-19 with a hard deficit

Annual spending on debt interest is closing in on $3 billion

Alberta reported an additional 399 cases of COVID-19 Thursday, on 9,217 tests, for a test positivity rate of 4.3 per cent. (Image courtesy CDC)
Red Deer down to 562 active COVID-19 cases

8 new COVID-19 deaths, 399 additional COVID-19 cases

Alberta premier Jason Kenney, right and Doug Schweitzer, Minister of Justice and Solicitor General, provide details about Bill 13, the Alberta Senate Election Act., in Edmonton Alta, on Wednesday June 26, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Minister Doug Schweitzer talks on Enhanced COVID-19 Business Benefit

Provincial government rolling out new benefit this April to better help small businesses.

Mike Ammeter (Photo by Rebecca Hadfield)
Sylvan Lake man elected chair of Canadian Canola Growers Association

Mike Ammeter is a local farmer located near the Town of Sylvan Lake

Bookings for COVID-19 vaccines for people age 75 or older start Wednesday. (File photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Updated: Delays for seniors booking for vaccine appointments

By 9:20 a.m. Wednesday, 4,500 seniors had booked their appointments

A helicopter flies past a mountain near McBride, B.C., on Saturday January 30, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Avalanche warning for backcountry users in North and South Rockies

Avalanche Canada is urging backcountry users to always check their regional avalanche forecasts

Supporters pray outside court in Stony Plain, Alta., on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, as a trial date was set for Pastor James Coates of GraceLife Church. He is charged with holding Sunday services in violation of Alberta’s COVID-19 rules and with breaking conditions of his bail release. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Trial date for jailed Alberta pastor charged with breaking COVID-19 health orders

The court says it will reconvene with lawyers on March 5 for a case management plan by teleconference

A pharmacist prepares a COVID-19 vaccine at Village Green Retirement Campus in Federal Way on Jan. 26. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
Canada approves use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

The country joins more than a dozen others in giving the shot the green light

Emily Keeping of Wetaskiwin, Alta., was last seen at 4:20 p.m. on Feb. 25, 2021 at the FasGas on 49 St and 50 Ave in Wetaskiwin. Supplied/ Wetaskiwin RCMP.
UPDATE: Wetaskiwin RCMP seek assistance in locating missing 11-year-old

Emily Keeping was last seen on Feb. 25, 2021 at the FasGas on 49 St and 50 Ave in Wetaskiwin.

Sylvan Lake's Winter Village lured many visitors to the town this winter. The town has launched a new contest to attract a new business.
(Black Press file photo)
Sylvan Lake offering rent-free storefront space to lure new businesses

Winning business proposal will get a storefront space rent-free for a year

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh holds a press conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
NDP will not trigger election as long as pandemic continues: Singh

‘“We will vote to keep the government going’

Students and staff at Gateway Christian School wore pink Wednesday in support of Pink Shirt Day, a worldwide anti-bullying initiative that was started in 2007. (Photo courtesy of Red Deer Public Schools)
Students, central Alberta community celebrate Pink Shirt Day

Mayor of Sylvan Lake Sean McIntyre supports anti-bullying cause

Most Read