Choosing the frames that suit your facial shape, complexion or style can be tricky. That’s where the experience and knowledge of a licensed optician can come in handy. The Central Alberta eyecare clinics of Drs. Heimdahl, Zobell and associates can help you work through the wide selection to find a frames and lens combination you’ll be happy with. Photo by Chris Calve

Choosing the frames that suit your facial shape, complexion or style can be tricky. That’s where the experience and knowledge of a licensed optician can come in handy. The Central Alberta eyecare clinics of Drs. Heimdahl, Zobell and associates can help you work through the wide selection to find a frames and lens combination you’ll be happy with. Photo by Chris Calve

Get your ideal eyeglasses for sight and style!

Ponoka opticians provide one-on-one service, quality materials for your next pair of glasses

Have you worn the same eyeglasses for years? New frames can be one of the easiest and most effective ways to upgrade your look.

Perhaps your current glasses, whether fitted with single-vision or progressive lenses, aren’t allowing you to see the way you need to.

In either case, sitting down with a licensed optician can help you find that perfect lens and frame combination, or get your current glasses working more effectively, says Chris Calve, optician and dispensary manager at Ponoka Eyecare. They’re part of a full-service group that also has eye clinics and dispensaries in Lacombe, Blackfalds, Hanna and Coronation.

“Glasses allow you to project your personality in a way that’s immediately evident,” says Chris, a licensed optician who works daily with his staff to put people into the right pair of glasses.

How else can you benefit from working with a local optician?

Personalized service – Shopping local for your next pair of glasses means you’ll receive one-on-one care and follow-up service. Your optician will work with you to find frames that not only complement your facial features and complexion, but can accommodate your prescription, something often overlooked at big box stores.

Quality is the key – You’ll find a wide selection of frames to suit your personality and facial shape, and while you might not be familiar with the names, you can be assured that Ponoka Eyecare and its sister stores only carry high-quality, independent brands that are durable, fashionable and will serve you well. “By moving away from some big brand names, we’re providing the best value we can with the most technologically advanced lenses and frames available,” Chris says.

Task-specific glasses – Approaching age 50 and afterward, you may experience dramatic changes in your eyesight. Once your optometrist has determined your prescription and your visual needs, your optician can help ensure you have the right glasses for every purpose – perhaps one pair for computer work and another for driving. Ponoka Eye Care can even do specialty eye wear like swimming goggles and dive masks, really high prescriptions – even safety eye wear!

Canadian-made technology – Do you like the idea of buying products manufactured in Canada? If so, you’ll be happy to learn many lenses and coatings used in the glasses you purchase here are made and tested under Canadian climate extremes by one of the country’s leading manufacturers.

Spotting potential issues – Licensed opticians and their staff are trained to watch for certain conditions and ask specific questions about health issues that may require further examination by an optometrist or other health professional.

*****

If you need a new prescription, you can find information about the doctors or make an appointment at your nearest office at 4youreyesonly.ca. You can also follow Ponoka Eyecare on Facebook.

 

Whether it’s for repairs or getting new eyewear, the staff at Ponoka Eye Clinic and its family of clinics in Central Alberta can help you find the frames and accessories that work well for you. Photo by Chris Calve

Whether it’s for repairs or getting new eyewear, the staff at Ponoka Eye Clinic and its family of clinics in Central Alberta can help you find the frames and accessories that work well for you. Photo by Chris Calve

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