Lotto players wait in line to purchase lottery tickets for the Mega Millions lottery at Lichines Liquor & Deli, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. Lottery players will have the chance at winning an estimated $1.6 billion in Tuesday’s Mega Millions drawing. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

$1.537 billion U.S. Mega Millions winning ticket sold in South Carolina

The winning ticket is worth about $877.8 million in a lump-sum cash payment

Lottery officials say someone bought a ticket in South Carolina to win the Mega Millions jackpot with a final total of $1.537 billion, just shy of the all-time world record.

The earlier Mega Millions estimate of $1.6 billion would have been a world record for lotteries, but actual sales came in just below the $1.586 billion Powerball jackpot prize shared by winners in California, Florida and Tennessee in January of 2016.

The ticket sold Tuesday is worth about $877.8 million in a lump-sum cash payment, which most winners choose to take.

“The final total was less than the $1.6 billion estimate,” said Carol Gentry, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Lottery, which leads a consortium of state lotteries participating in the Mega Millions jackpot.

“Estimates are based on historical patterns,” she explained Wednesday morning in a phone interview with The Associated Press. “The jackpot’s been rolling since it was hit in July in California, but there are few precedents for a jackpot of this size. Typically about 70 per cent of sales occur on the drawing day, so forecasting precise numbers in advance can be difficult. That’s why we always use the term estimate.”

READ MORE: Mega Millions, Powerball prizes come down to math, long odds

It’s possible the world will never know who bought the ticket in South Carolina that matches all six numbers in Tuesday night’s drawing.

South Carolina is one of eight states — along with Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio and Texas — where winners can remain anonymous.

A portion of the prize money will go to the retailer; the exact amount is determined by each state, Gentry said.

The biggest Mega Millions jackpot winner prior to this was a $656 million ticket sold back in 2012, she said, “so it’s a record for Mega Millions and it came very close to breaking the world record of all the jackpots.”

The winning numbers were 5, 28, 62, 65, 70 and Mega Ball 5. No details on where the winning ticket was sold were immediately available. But the lucky player overcame miserable odds: The chance of matching all six numbers and winning the top prize is 1 in 302.5 million.

Mega Millions is played in 44 states as well as Washington, D.C., and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

It will likely be days or even weeks before a winner steps forward to claim the prize.

READ MORE: Record-breaking $113 million Lotto Max jackpot up for grabs

Lottery officials and financial managers encourage people to take time to map out a strategy for investing their hundreds of millions of dollars, and winners must deal with security concerns befitting someone who suddenly is immensely wealthy. Depending on the state, winners have from 180 days to a year to claim their prize.

The Mega Millions jackpot grew so large because it had been nearly three months since a player had matched all six numbers and won the top prize. The last time that happened was July 24, when 11 co-workers from California won a $543 million prize.

Although Tuesday’s jackpot was extraordinarily large, it’s no fluke. It reflects a trend toward ever-growing lottery prizes due to changes in the game that worsened the odds with hopes that bigger jackpots would result in better sales.

Officials with the Powerball game were the first to make that move in October 2015 when changing the odds of winning the jackpot from 1 in 175 million to 1 in 292.2 million. Mega Millions followed suit in October 2017, resulting in the odds worsening from 1 in 259 million to 1 in 302.5 million.

While most attention has been on the Mega Millions game, Powerball also has been soaring. The estimated prize for Powerball’s annuity option in Wednesday night’s drawing is $620 million, with a cash prize of $354.3 million.

The Associated Press

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