COVID-19 exposure notices have been issued to all four Houston schools. (Black Press file image)

2,433 new COVID-19 cases identified in Alberta Saturday

Red Deer now has 733 active cases

The Government of Alberta has identified 2,433 new COVID-19 cases Saturday.

There are now 22,504 active cases of the virus in the province – 62.1 per cent of these cases have been identified as variants of concern. One new death was reported as well, bringing the provincial total to 2,083.

The City of Red Deer now has 733 active cases of the virus, which is six more than Friday’s update, according to geospatial mapping on the provincial government’s website.

When looking at the province’s mapping for COVID-19 cases on the municipality setting, regions are defined by metropolitan areas, cities, urban service areas, rural areas and towns with approximately 10,000 or more people; smaller regions are incorporated into the corresponding rural area.

With that setting, Red Deer County has 190 active cases, Lacombe County has 154, the City of Lacombe has 167, Sylvan Lake has 118, Mountain View County has 86, Olds has 114, Clearwater County has 77 and Stettler County has 90.

The City of Camrose has 129 active cases, Camrose County has 53, Kneehill County has 51, Drumheller has 21 and Starland County has four.

On the local geographic area setting, Wetaskiwin County, including Maskwacis, has 155 active. Ponoka, including East Ponoka County, has 91 active cases and Rimbey, which includes West Ponoka County and parts of Lacombe County, has 45 active.

Overall the central zone has 2,542 active cases, while the Calgary zone has 9,423, the Edmonton zone has 6,065, the north zone has 3,233 and the south zone has 1,165. The locations of 76 active cases are unknown.

Provincially, 646 people are currently hospitalized by COVID-19, with 152 of those individual in an intensive care unit. In the central zone, 51 are hospitalized – eight of those individuals are in an ICU.

On Saturday, the provincial government made a “small update” on how youth born in 2006-09, with eligible underlying health conditions in Phase 2B, can book vaccine appointments, said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health.

“Previously, we required a doctor’s letter for those 12-15 before booking an appointment. Starting today, a letter is not required. This change is made based on feedback from parents, family doctors, and pediatricians,” she said on Twitter.

“Parents and guardians can make a decision to have their child get the vaccine if they’re eligible. If parents/guardians have questions, they can talk to their doctor, but they don’t need to get a letter before getting immunized.”



sean.mcintosh@reddeeradvocate.com

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