‘Another step:’ Federal Court judge releases ruling in Cree and Dene

Justice Sebastien Grammond wrote about the importance of including the two languages in a ruling

The Federal Court of Canada says it has issued a ruling in Cree and Dene — the first time it’s done so in an Indigenous language.

Justice Sebastien Grammond wrote about the importance of including the two languages in a ruling last Friday that overturned the suspension of a First Nations band councillor in Fort McMurray, Alta.

A summary of the ruling was written and recorded in Cree and Dene, which are the languages of the parties that were involved.

“The Federal Court is committed to being more accessible to Indigenous people when they wish to bring legal disputes for resolution by the court,” wrote Grammond.

“Many court hearings are held directly in the Indigenous community or via webcast, and where appropriate court procedure is adapted to make space for Indigenous protocols.

“With the release of today’s decision, the court is also taking another step in making court decisions more accessible.”

Grammond thanked the “language keepers” who assisted with preparing the summary in Cree and Dene.

The case involved Samantha Whalen from the Fort McMurray 468 First Nation who was suspended by her council colleagues. They had concluded she had engaged in wrongful conduct, including the disclosure of financial information and her participation in a blockade of a First Nation’s business.

Whalen argued that the council didn’t have the power to suspend her and the Federal Court agreed.

ALSO READ: Cheers erupt as Federal Court judge approves historic gay purge settlement

A court spokesman said efforts have been underway for the last 15 years to bring in practical initiatives such as guidelines for litigation involving Indigenous people and for conducting court hearings in their communities.

Andrew Baumberg, legal counsel for the Federal Court, said court members decided at a recent meeting to provide summaries of judgments in the language of the Indigenous communities involved in appropriate cases.

“In recognition of the important role that language plays in First Nation communities,” Baumberg wrote in an email, “the Federal Court intends to continue to increase access to justice for Indigenous people.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

40 new COVID-19 cases confirmed in Alberta

Province’s central zone still has no active cases

Alberta reports just seven new COVID-19 cases

‘Today’s numbers mark an occasion to be celebrated’

Lacombe County Reopens Sandy Point Beach for the season

Signage is posted at the beach outlining public health orders

Still no confirmed active COVID-19 cases in Red Deer, central zone

There are 15 new confirmed cases were in Alberta, the province said Thursday

Lacombe’s Cilantro and Chive has ‘food on plates’ again

Dining room service opens within health guidelines

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The Lacombe Express covers the stories that matter to you and to our community

PODCAST: The Expert tackles the return of sports

Cam Moon, Joe Whitbread, Byron Hackett and Todd Vaughan discuss how sports can come back

Red Deerians protest against racism on Saturday

This was the third protest in the city this week

‘It’s brewing’: Inmates, guards worry about violence after COVID-19 lockdown

‘Thirteen weeks in a cage the size of your (bathroom) has been pretty devastating’

Feds sign $105-million deal with Bombardier for two new Challenger jets

Department of National Defence announced the deal with Bombardier on Saturday

‘Alarmed:’ Health critic calls for more data on COVID-19 in trucking industry

Public Health Agency of Canada does not collect information on long-haul truckers

Montreal man believes rough arrest caught on video was racially motivated

Montreal man believes rough arrest caught on video was racially motivated

N.B. police shooting of Indigenous woman leads to questions on ‘wellness checks’

N.B. police shooting of Indigenous woman leads to questions on ‘wellness checks’

Most Read