City briefs: Spring clean up begins this week

The City of Lacombe’s annual spring Community Clean Up Campaign – a special refuse pickup that provides residents

  • May. 22, 2014 11:00 a.m.

The City of Lacombe’s annual spring Community Clean Up Campaign – a special refuse pickup that provides residents with an opportunity to dispose of household and yard refuse that one would not normally place in the regular garbage bins – will be held from May 20th to May 29th.

“We are looking forward to working residents to keep basements and garages uncluttered, and neighbourhood alleyways free of debris,” said Infrastructure Services Director Matthew Goudy. “The bi-annual clean up campaigns, along with the annual toxic roundup and other waste management initiatives are making an important and lasting difference in creating a cleaner, safer, more livable Lacombe.”

Residents are asked to organize and separate their items into piles for pick up at the front of the property by 7:00am on the day your area is scheduled. All items must be sorted and neatly tied or bagged. Trees, brush or limbs cannot be more than 10 feet long or they will not be picked up.

Do not place items on the sidewalk, alley or street; items must be left at the property line. Debris left in the alleys will not be picked up. Ensure that pedestrian and vehicle traffic are not blocked. Do not place refuse next to or touching the bin used for normal household garbage pickup.

Materials should be sorted according to type such as metal, appliances, furniture, wood and garden waste.

Items must be left at the property line. Debris left in the alleys will not be picked up. Ensure that pedestrian and vehicle traffic are not blocked. Unmanageable, unsorted piles or piles containing hazardous waste material will not be collected. Any items placed out after the scheduled pick up date will remain the responsibility of the resident.

The Community Clean Up campaigns are held twice a year – Spring Clean Up begins on Tuesday after the May Long Weekend and Fall Clean Up begins the Tuesday after the Thanksgiving weekend in October.

Blackfalds Field House Society dissolves

A local non-profit organization which has been fundraising since June 2009 will officially be done at the end of May. As of May 31, the Blackfalds Field House Society will dissolve after having helped raise $1.5 million for the multi-purpose recreation facility, the Abbey Centre, which opened its doors March 31.

“When we had our establishment meeting in June of 2009 we knew we would be committing to at least a five year project,” said President Carol Simpson. She added that the group is proud to have been part of the legacy of what was known for years as the Blackfalds Field House Project. “To know that we helped play a pivotal role with our advocacy and support of this facility is very important to the society members. We are amazed to realize that our original goal of fundraising $750,000 ended up doubling in amount. No local group has ever fundraised such a large amount for a project in the community.

“We feel comfortable at this time dissolving the society knowing our goals were accomplished and the Abbey Centre is up and running.”

Sean Barnes, director of community services agreed.

“I’m impressed that a group of citizens stepped up and put so much effort forth for something they thought was important to have in their community. The Blackfalds Field House Society members worked extremely hard over the last five years on a project that will forever benefit everyone in this region. I wish them well and thank them for their hard work.”

Abbey Centre Grand Opening Celebration planning is well underway by Town staff to celebrate and recognize all of the contributors, including the Blackfalds Field House Society. Celebrations will take place May 22 – 25th.

New parklet pilot project to enhance downtown Lacombe

Two parklets, temporary public spaces, have been installed in downtown Lacombe. One is located at 50 St. and the other in the Flatiron Block parking lot. These locations will provide people opportunity to sit, eat, chat and enjoy Lacombe. The parklets are in support Lacombe’s Downtown Area Redevelopment Plan (DARP) and will hopefully encourage people to get out and enjoy Lacombe’s historic downtown.

Planning Intern Josh de Jon said that these two locations were strategically chosen because they both see a high volume of pedestrian traffic.

“We wanted to install these parklets where the people are, while at the same time taking as little parking away as possible,” said de Jong. “The two locations, one situated at the end of an underused space within a parking lot and the other in front of a vacant lot, will help the City evaluate public interest for a more permanent public space in downtown.”

If the idea of a permanent public space downtown doesn’t gain public support, all of the street furniture (benches, planters and such) can be used at other locations throughout the city once the pilot project is complete. According to de Jong, the pilot projects are useful in that they allow the municipality to gauge the long-term viability of such initiatives.