Heat warning in effect for Lacombe and region

Officials urge residents to take precautions against heat-related illnesses

More hot temperatures are on the way for Lacombians as a heat warning has been issued for the region.

According to Environment Canada, a period with maximum daily temperatures reaching near 29 C or above and minimum overnight temperatures near 14 C or above is expected to begin today and will last until Friday.

The warning is also in effect for the City of Red Deer, Lacombe County near Clive, Alix and Mirror; Lacombe County near Eckville and Lacombe Country near Lacombe, Blackfalds and Bentley.

Residents are also advised to take the following precautions to protect themselves, their families and their neighbours – consider rescheduling outdoor activities to cooler hours of the day, take frequent breaks from the heat spending time outdoors at your house or at cooled public buildings (including malls or indoor pools); drink plenty of water and other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverages to stay hydrated and do not leave any person or pet inside a closed vehicle, for any length of time.

It’s also recommended that people watch for symptoms of heat stroke or heat exhaustion, such as high body temperature, lack of sweat, confusion, fainting, and unconsciousness.

Particular vigilance is urged for vulnerable individuals, including children, seniors, individuals with pre-existing lung, heart, kidney, nervous system, mental health or diabetic conditions, outdoor workers, as well as those who are socially isolated.

For more heat health advice and information, check out www.ahs.ca/heat.

According to Environment Canada, heat warnings are issued when very high temperature conditions are expected to pose an elevated risk of heat illnesses, such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion.

The risks are greater for young children, pregnant women, older adults, people with chronic illnesses and people working or exercising outdoors.

Also, it’s important to check on older family, friends and neighbours and make sure they are cool and drinking water. Watch for the symptoms of heat illness which can include dizziness/fainting, nausea/vomiting, rapid breathing and heartbeat, extreme thirst, decreased urination with unusually dark urine.

-Weber

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