Stephane Perrault, the acting chief electoral officer, says Elections Canada must stay above the political fray and should not be perceived as being involved in anything that could influence the outcome of a campaign. A woman enters Maple High School in Vaughan, Ont., to cast her vote in the Canadian federal election on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Power

Stephane Perrault, the acting chief electoral officer, says Elections Canada must stay above the political fray and should not be perceived as being involved in anything that could influence the outcome of a campaign. A woman enters Maple High School in Vaughan, Ont., to cast her vote in the Canadian federal election on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Power

Liberals, Tories evenly matched when it comes to war chests for local campaigns

The NDP, meanwhile, has not managed to budge its finances out of a distant third place

The Liberals and Conservatives are matched fairly evenly when it comes to how ready their local campaigns are to pay for the coming federal election, a shift from when the big blue machine dominated the scene the last time around.

The Conservatives have boasted of besting the Liberals when it comes to fundraising at the national level, but an in-depth analysis by The Canadian Press suggests a closer race between the red and blue teams of candidates knocking on doors in neighbourhoods nationwide.

The 2018 annual financial returns for riding associations, which are still trickling in to Elections Canada, show Conservative ridings ended last year with about $24.2 million in combined net assets. The Liberals were not far behind, with about $21 million in net assets spread out nationwide.

The Conservatives and Liberals also dominate the top 20 richest associations in the country.

The relatively small gap between the Conservatives and the Liberals marks a shift from how things looked heading into the last federal election, when Conservative riding associations ended 2014 with net assets totalling more than $19 million — more than double the roughly $8 million amassed by Liberal riding associations.

The NDP, meanwhile, has not managed to budge its finances out of a distant third place, with its riding associations reporting about $3.8 million in net assets in 2018. None of its riding associations are among the top-100 richest in the country.

The Greens had about $735,000, although only about half of their riding associations have submitted their reports so far.

A party running a full slate of candidates will be allowed to spend about $28 million during the coming election campaign, plus an average of about $110,000 per candidate, depending on the riding. Unlike in 2015, new election laws mean the cap will not increase with the length of the campaign.

The 2018 financial reports, which are the latest figures available, suggest the Conservatives and Liberals will be well-equipped to reach the spending limit in the lead up to the Oct. 21 election, but the NDP and the Greens will have to ramp up their fundraising and look to their national parties and wealthier riding associations for help.

ALSO READ: Federal leaders’ debates conflicts with countrywide environment panel in October

The financial reports also show the Liberal riding associations brought in about $8.5 million in contributions last year, compared to about $4.7 million for the Conservatives. The NDP riding associations received about $1.2 million in contributions last year.

“Grassroots Liberals over the last few years have worked with Justin Trudeau to grow a base of fundraising support that will be competitive at the local level with the Conservative party for the first time in a generation,” said Braeden Caley, spokesman for the Liberal Party of Canada.

Cory Hann, spokesman for the Conservative Party of Canada, said he would have expected better financial results from a party in power.

At the national level, the Conservatives raised about $24.2 million from 104,000 donors in 2018.

The Liberals raised $15.9 million from 66,000 individuals.

“The national party probably has some things to learn from their riding associations, then, because they haven’t quite been able to close the gap like that with us on the national level,” Hann said.

The Conservative riding associations also received about $2.5 million in transfers from the national party, but Hann said that was the result of a revenue-sharing agreement that sends a percentage of money raised through membership sales back to the local ridings.

The numbers also tell a story when broken down by geographical area, providing some clues on where the biggest battles will be.

Each party is allowed to spend a total of $3.7 million in British Columbia, but according to the reports filed so far, only the Conservative riding associations had enough cash on hand at the end of last year to meet that limit.

In Quebec, where each party can spend $6.9 million, none of the parties came close. The Liberal riding associations were in the best shape, with $3.6 million, with the Conservatives having about $1.3 million.

The NDP’s riding associations in Quebec, the province that was key to its good fortune in the 2011 campaign, had only about $615,000.

Melissa Bruno, national director for the NDP, said the party has been working with its deputy leader, Montreal MP Alexandre Boulerice, to raise its fundraising game in Quebec, particularly after losing so many seats there in 2015.

“There was a lot of work that needed to be done to repair relationships with our party activists and that is some of the work that Alex has been integral and crucial in helping the federal party with,” said Bruno.

The riding financial data was downloaded from Elections Canada on Aug. 7. The Liberals had filed 331 of 338 returns containing details of net assets by that date. The Conservatives had filed 324, the New Democrats 312 and the Greens had submitted 174 reports. The Bloc Quebecois, which runs candidates only in Quebec’s 78 ridings, had filed 18 reports. The People’s Party of Canada only registered as a party in January.

Joanna Smith, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

federal election 2019

Just Posted

Police officers and their dogs undergo training at the RCMP Police Dog Services training centre in Innisfail, Alta., on Wednesday, July 15, 2015. Mounties say they are searching for an armed and dangerous man near a provincial park in northern Alberta who is believed to have shot and killed a service dog during a police chase. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
RCMP search for armed man in northern Alberta after police dog shot and killed

Cpl. Deanna Fontaine says a police service dog named Jago was shot during the pursuit

Alberta now has 2,336 active cases of COVID-19, with 237 people in hospital, including 58 in intensive care. (Black Press file photo)
Red Deer down to 73 active cases of COVID-19, lowest since early November

The Central zone has 253 active cases of the virus

The Sylvan Lake Gulls show off the home jerseys (white) and their way jerseys at the Gulls Media Day on June 17, before the season opener. Following the media day, the team took to the field for their first practise. (Photo by Megan Roth/Sylvan Lake News)
Sylvan Lake Gulls ready to throw first pitch as construction continues

The Gulls inaugural season kicks off June 18 with a game against the Edmonton Prospects

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seen during a joint news conference following the EU-Canada Summit, in Brussels, Belgium, Tuesday June 15, 2021. Trudeau says Canada is on track now to have 68 million doses delivered by the end of July, which is more than enough to fully vaccinate all 33.2 million Canadians over the age of 12. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Vaccine deliveries enough to fully vaccinate all eligible Canadians by end of July

Three in four eligible Canadians now have their first dose, nearly one in five fully vaccinated.

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam listens to a question during a news conference, in Ottawa, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021. The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases attributed to the highly contagious Delta variant grew in Canada this week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s public health agency reports spike in confirmed cases of Delta variant

More than 2,000 cases of the variant confirmed across all 10 provinces and in one territory

The federal government says it wants to ban most flavoured vaping products in a bid to reduce their appeal to youth. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Craig Mitchelldyer
Health Canada proposes ban on most vaping flavours it says appeal to youth

If implemented, the regulations would restrict all e-cigarette flavours except tobacco, mint and menthol

The Montreal Police logo is seen in Montreal on Wednesday, July 8, 2020. Some Quebec politicians are calling for an investigation after a video was released that appears to show a Montreal police officer with his leg on a young Black man’s neck during an arrest. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Probe called for after video appearing to show Montreal officer’s knee on Black youth’s neck

Politicians call for investigation after clip evokes memories of George Floyd incident

Thousands of protesters make their way through the downtown core during a Black Lives Matter protest in Ottawa, Friday June 5, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
MPs’ study of systemic racism in policing concludes RCMP needs new model

Chair of the House public safety committee says it’s time for a reckoning on ‘quasi-military’ structure

A case filled with packages of boneless chicken breasts is shown in a grocery store Sunday, May 10, 2020, in southeast Denver. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-David Zalubowski
One million chickens euthanized during labour dispute at Quebec slaughterhouse

Premier says waste amounts to 13 per cent of the province’s chicken production thrown in the garbage

A section of the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies is seen west of Cochrane, Alta., Thursday, June 17, 2021. A joint federal-provincial review has denied an application for an open-pit coal mine in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains, saying its impacts on the environment and Indigenous rights aren’t worth the economic benefits it would bring. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Panel says Grassy Mountain coal mine in Alberta Rockies not in public interest

Public hearings on the project in southern Alberta’s Crowsnest Pass region were held last fall

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on Friday, February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
U.S. border restrictions to remain in place until at least July 21

Safety minister says Canada, U.S. extending restrictions on non-essential international travel

Most Read