Squirrels are damaging some maple syrup operations

Producers say replacing damaged equipment can be time-consuming and expensive

Maple syrup producers have more than the weather to worry about. Frenetic squirrels are chomping on equipment, crimping the flow of sap at some operations.

Damage from wildlife — deer, bear woodpeckers, and squirrels — is not unusual for maple producers, but this year an abundant population of squirrels is disrupting plastic sap tubing and spouts at some sugaring operations in New England.

That means producers must go out into sometimes deep snow to find and replace the damaged lines that transport the sap from the maple trees or other chewed or missing equipment, which producers say can be time-consuming and expensive.

“Occasionally they declare war. And it seems like they have this year,” said Ruth Goodrich of Goodrich’s Maple Farm in Danville, Vermont, the largest maple producing state.

READ MORE: Flying squirrels found to glow pink in the dark

The business, which also sells maple equipment, thins out other trees so the maples don’t have competition and to remove the food source for squirrels. But on a parcel of state land it rents in Groton where other trees are mixed in, the squirrels did a number on the equipment.

The boom in the squirrel population is mostly tied to an increase in food source, such as acorns and other mast from trees, said Mark Isselstadt, maple specialist with the University of Vermont Extension. But the squirrels aren’t causing problems for all producers, he said.

The varmints haven’t been any worse than normal this year for Bascom Maple Farms in Alstead, New Hampshire.

“We haven’t had a lot of snow cover,” said Bruce Bascom. “We’ve only got about a foot of snow here. I think the squirrels are not having that hard a winter.”

But Lyle Merrifield of Gorham, Maine, said he’s had to fix about 60 spots in his operation damaged by the chomping critters.

The trouble is the squirrels could take one bite of tubing and move another 100 feet (30.5 metres) where they could take another bite, making the damage hard to find, said Merrifield, who is president of the Maine Maple Producers Association.

“I’ve heard a lot of people talk about squirrel damage so it’s probably the worst we’ve seen, combined with the deep snow, just that combination,” he said.

There’s no way to completely control the squirrels, Isselstadt said. It’s best to wear gloves when handling the tubing so salt and oil from bare hands isn’t left behind to attract wildlife. He advises against using any chemical deterrence on the tubing or anywhere near it. Trapping and shooting are also options.

But he said that won’t necessarily prevent the problem, because It doesn’t take many squirrels to affect the system.

“They’re able to cover ground and do some damage, and you can fix a line and they’ll be right back to it the next day,” Isselstadt said.

Lisa Rathke, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Woofs and Laughs coming to Lacombe Memorial Centre

Comedy night supports Saving Grave Animal Society

Lacombe County fire permit season begins March 1

Lacombe County reminds people that permit requests are free and easy to submit online

Lacombe IODE chapter supports Alberta Council of Womens Shelters

Lord Lascelles Chapter looking to raise $100,000 for children exposed to domestic violence

New municipal assessor appointed for the City of Lacombe

Council awarded the assessment services contract to and appointed Wild Rose Assessment Services Inc

New bylaw hours changes service delivery in Lacombe

Council approved changes to the Enforcement Services schedule

WATCH: Night Among the Stars Celebrity Dance-off supports Lacombe BBBS

Over $12,000 raised for Dancer’s Edge Parents Association and Lacombe BBBS

Courts to decide regarding Ponoka County’s north-west area structure plan

Ponoka Right To Farm Society versus Ponoka County

Canada prepared to monitor for community spread of COVID-19: Tam

The U.S. confirmed one case of the new coronavirus, or COVID-19, in California Thursday

11-year-old Sylvan Lake burn survivor using his story to inspire others

Kaden Howard was recently named the 2020 Champion Child for the Stollery in Edmonton

Conservative MP questions whether rail blockades constitute terrorism

Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett travelled to B.C. to meet Indigenous leaders

Lawsuit over African mine can be heard in British Columbia: Supreme Court

B.C. courts dismissed Nevsun’s attempts to make Eritrea the forum for any lawsuit proceedings

MPs to examine privacy implications of facial-recognition technology used by RCMP

The MPs will look at how the technology affects the privacy, security and safety of children

Winners and losers in Alberta’s 2020 budget

UCP government has tabled a new 20-per-cent tax on vaping devices and liquids

‘Finer focus on job creation:’ Alberta government files red-ink budget

Projected deficit of $6.8 billion on revenues of $50 billion

Most Read