Here is how to get fit – eat like a sumo wrestler

In the past, I have written several articles about combat sports.

In the past, I have written several articles about combat sports.

I have also written several articles about healthy eating.

This week, I would like to combine the two. Let’s talk about sumo wrestlers and how they can help you get fit.

Sumo wrestlers’ bulk is often mistaken for flab.

But, the truth is, they are fit, not fat.

World Sumo Champion Byamba Ulambayar is 6 ft. 1 and weighs 360 lbs.

He admits he’s not in as great of shape now, but when he was 18 and weighed 330 lbs. he only had 11% body fat.

Yes, it is important for sumo wrestlers to be big. However, it is also important that they are strong and in shape.

It takes a lot of energy and effort for sumos to push and throw their opponents around the ring like they do and they wouldn’t be able to do it effectively if they were fat and flabby.

Physical activity uses energy.

Sumo wrestling is no different. That means sumo wrestlers need to eat to fuel themselves. They also need to eat a lot to gain the large mass necessary for the sport.

As any athlete will tell you, when eating lots of food to fuel yourself for physical exertion, it’s not only important to eat lots – it’s important to eat lots of healthy foods.

Sumos accomplish this by consuming massive amounts of a Japanese stew called chankonabe.

Chankonabe is a one-pot dish that contains ingredients which provide sumos with basically everything they need.

There is no set recipe for chankonabe, and it can be prepared with anything the cook has on hand.

Typically though, ingredients include high amounts of meats for protein and vegetables for vitamins. It is also cooked in a fish broth, which means less nutrients get wasted in the cooking process.

Nutrients that would be lost if the ingredients were fried or grilled instead mix with the broth and can still be absorbed.

Sumos do a lot of weird things to gain mass too, like working out on empty stomachs, only eating once or twice a day, drinking beer with all their meals and sleeping after every meal. Most fitness gurus in this country will probably recommend against those things, but there are still a few things we can take away from the habits of sumos.

It sounds weird, but sumos kind of embody the basic equation of fitness: healthy food plus rigorous exercise equals fitness. The important thing to remember is that these things go together.

You can’t succeed by having one without the other.

You can eat all the food you want, but as most of us know to our own cost, you are not going to reap any benefits by sitting on the couch.

Instead, you are more likely to end up looking like a very unsuccessful sumo wrestler.

Exercise doesn’t work without food either.

Without proper fuel for physical activity, you are going to feel pretty miserable while working out pretty quick and your body won’t have the nutrients it needs to do anything constructive with the exercise either.

Secondly, keep in mind that you need healthy food and quality exercise to be successful in getting fit.

You need to eat to get fit, but you also need to get healthy.

Eating fast food and candy bars isn’t going to give your body anything beneficial to work with.

Working out is important too. No matter what your choice of exercise is, make sure you are doing it enough and doing it properly so that you actually get something out of it.

Finally, if you do these things right, you will enjoy it.

Going back to Ulambayar again, he will tell you that he eats chankonabe every day not just because he should, but because he likes the way it makes him feel and feels the same way about sumo wrestling.

Every time Ulambayar wakes up after a long workout and a good meal, he says he feels stronger, which is an encouraging feeling for anyone.

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