Mae West knew when men were men

As a male, have you lost the “tiger-in-the-tank?”

Dr. Gifford Jones

As a male, have you lost the “tiger-in-the-tank?”

Possibly you are more irritable, suffer insomnia, have problems at work, lost height, lack energy and lack erections? Now you wonder if testosterone therapy is what’s needed.

Mae West, the movie sex queen of long ago, knew what made men, men. She greeted them with a sultry voice, “Is that a gun in your pocket, or are you happy to see me?”

I first became interested in what’s often called ‘The big T’ years ago when I interviewed Dr. Malcolm Carruthers at a conference on aging in London, England. Carruthers, a Harley Street specialist, was one of the early pioneers in testosterone therapy.

During the interview I met one of his patients who had just received a second testosterone injection. He admitted to me that, following the first injection, he had made love three times in 24 hours! Needless to say, he was a happy camper, and if you want to be shot by a jealous lover at 95 years of age, this is the way to achieve that goal!

But will you reach 95 if you take testosterone? It’s been aptly said, “All would be well if there were no ‘buts’.”

The problem is there has always been, and still is, a debate as to whether a testosterone boost increases the risk of prostate cancer, stroke or heart attack.

Carruthers has treated over 2,000 men with testosterone. He says, “The myth about testosterone being linked to prostate cancer has been deeply rooted in medical consciousness for over 60 years without this happening.”

But what about the #1 killer, heart attack? I also interviewed Dr. Peter Collins, professor of Cardiology at the Imperial College of Science and Medicine in London. He is a leading expert on testosterone and coronary heart disease.

Collins, like Carruthers, believes linking testosterone to heart attack is wrong. In fact, he claims evidence shows normal amounts of testosterone protect against it.

Collins’ research shows testosterone increases coronary blood flow by as much as 15 to 20%.

This is why patients suffering from angina (heart pain that increases with exercise) can be helped by testosterone treatment. In addition, testosterone also decreases blood cholesterol and fibrinogen, the small particles that form blood clots. Dr. Eugene Shippen, a U.S. expert on testosterone pathology, claims those suffering from erectile dysfunction (ED) are often usually suffering from low blood testosterone. These men, he claims, are two to three times more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke. This evidence supplements the work of Dr. Steven Grover, Professor of Medicine at McGill University, Montreal. He suggests, “Impotence is the alarm bell for a heart attack.”

He adds that, “In approximately 25 per cent of cardiovascular patients, their first symptom of heart disease is that they drop dead.” This is not an encouraging warning and all the more reason to find a sign to indicate an attack is imminent.

Dr. Grover’s study compared 4,000 men with and without cardiovascular disease. It showed that men with this problem had a 54 per cent chance of having ED than those without cardiovascular disease.

Also not well known is that testosterone helps to fight one of the nation’s big killers, diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes patients often develop insulin resistance. They possess adequate amounts of insulin, but their cells refuse to accept it. Testosterone increases the effectiveness of insulin.

See the web site at www.docgiff.com.

 

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