Political policies have real world consequences

Albertans deserve a government that understands lessons of the past, and can rise to today’s challenges

BY RON ORR

MLA for Lacombe-Ponoka

Alberta’s first quarter update is in and the numbers are shocking.

The NDP government officially revealed that it has plunged our province into a net-debt position for the first time since 1999.

Since 2008, the NDP and former PC governments have squandered a whopping $40 billion. Our savings are gone, and the government will slap a $3 billion carbon tax on all Albertans, which will come into effect on Jan. 1st.

The first quarter update is just the latest indicator that the NDP’s economic policies are making the worst of a bad situation, as the steepest recession since the 1980s continues to rage.

Even higher than projected oil prices are not minimizing the damage, as the government continues to play around with policies based on ideology rather than reality. It’s the kind of naïve political agenda that can only work if nobody notices the real world consequences.

Guess what?

The 100,000 Albertans who lost full time jobs over the past year noticed. The credit rating agencies noticed, downgrading Alberta’s credit four times in the past year.

The business world has noticed, withdrawing urgently required investment from our province at an unprecedented rate. Energy companies have noticed, shifting their resources to neighbouring Saskatchewan, and Main Street has noticed, laying off workers and closing the doors to multi-generational family businesses at an alarming rate.

The fact is that this government’s economic incompetence is being felt from Alberta’s deepest coalmine to its highest office tower. Sadly, it seems the only office that hasn’t noticed belongs to the minister’s offices in the Legislature.

Over the past year, Wildrose has fulfilled its duty to Albertans by both raising concerns with this government’s economic mismanagement and providing alternatives. We will continue to do so, because these policies have real world consequences.

This year, the NDP government will borrow more than $12 billion.

As a direct result, taxpayers will be paying more than $1 billion in interest payments. To put a billion dollars into perspective, the Terry Fox Foundation in all its 36 years of fundraising since 1980, has raised a total of over $650 million. To get to $1 billion will take another 20 years for a total of almost 56 years with all of Canada contributing.

This means that $1 billion will no longer be available for healthcare, education and other services.

It is a $1 billion drag on our economy at a time when every available resource is required to fight this recession.

It’s also an additional $1billion in the hole that the next generation must fill in order to achieve its potential. Continued deficit financing to prop up a short-sighted tax-and-spend agenda will only lead to more job losses and lost opportunities in every region of our province.

Albertans deserve better.

We deserve a competent government that understands the lessons of the past, a government capable of rising to face today’s challenges.

The NDP government may be oblivious to the consequences of their failed economic policies, but Wildrose is not.

Politics matter. Economic policies have real world consequences.

If you have issues or concerns you would like to discuss with me, please feel free to contact me at the constituency office- 403-782-7725 or by mail #101 4892 46 St., Lacombe. The postal code is T4L 2B4, or email at Lacombe.ponoka@assembly.ab.ca.

 

Just Posted

Lacombe Generals extend win streak to three in 8-2 win

Lacombe plays Innisfail in final game of 2018

40-year Big Brother match a gift to Lacombe man

Andy Pawlyk and his Little Brother Chris Selathamby honoured at BBBS Awards Night

Lacombe Police Service rolls out holiday roadside check stops

Officers with approved screening device can request a breath test from anyone they lawfully stop

UPDATED: Calgary Police receive multiple bomb threats

Similar threats received across Canada and the United States

Town Center removed from Lacombe Southeast Area Structure Plan

Developer of Lacombe Market Square requested ammendment to the plan

WATCH: CP Holiday Train rolls into Lacombe

Kelly Prescott performed for hundreds of Central Albertans

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

‘I practically begged’: B.C. woman with breast cancer denied referral to Calgary

Breast cancer patient left to fight disease alone after being denied referral to Calgary

Facebook reveals bug gave apps unauthorized access to 6.8 million users’ photos

It’s believed up to 1,500 apps built by 876 developers had access to Facebook Stories, private photos

21 detained before Paris protests as police deploy in force

There was a strong police presence outside the central Saint Lazare train station, where police in riot gear checked bags

New home for Calgary Flames estimated to cost up to $600 million

The city and the Flames are not yet talking on who will pay how much for a building to replace the Saddledome

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Most Read