Reader asks ‘When did Prime Minister wear out his welcome?’

Recent events and comments have raised the question: “When did Prime Minister Harper wear out his welcome?”

Recent events and comments have raised the question: “When did Prime Minister Harper wear out his welcome?” What day or what event was the pivotal point?

In regards to the PMO organizing and using PMO staff and interns to protest a Trudeau press event on Parliament Hill, a conservative supporter said it was a childish act, not even high school but an elementary school act. There was an aura of frustration, parents waiting for a child to grow up, a teacher waiting for parents to take home an unruly child.

When did he stay too long?

Was it the senate scandals, the $90,000 payment, was it the extra $50,000 to add blue paint to the Prime Minister’s plane, was it the latest attack ads and 10 per centers, the American condemnation of his environmental record, the F-35 plane costs, shipping limos to India, $16 orange juice, his hair stylist, the abortion issue handling, the muzzling of MPs, muzzling of scientists, fights with the PBO Kevin Page, the fights with Elections Canada or was it when Canadians accepted the reality of climate change. The list goes on.

When did political conversations start being about cabinet shuffles, leadership rules and potential candidates, the timing of a leadership race, unelected boys in short pants ruling the government, abandonment of principles, back bench rebellions, trained seals, puppets and a Liberal majority in 2015?

You see Conservative MPs, Ministers, strategists wagging their fingers less, talking less loudly, and not looking the host or camera in the eye. When did this happen?

The next election is two years away, and conservatives are talking about losing the next election, or getting a minority government, whether Harper will be allowed one more election.

MPs and ministers are talking about retiring; Harper is talking about cabinet shuffles, a throne speech and hitting the reset button mid-term.

These are the actions of a man, who after having stayed too long, is struggling to achieve a sense of relevancy.

One has suggested it started the day after the last election.

It just took time to permeate the minds of the grassroots that winning a majority government was not the panacea they were expecting, and that it was all about power for the few and maintaining power for the few.

When did it become socially acceptable for conservatives to denounce their leader and his actions? When did back benchers realize they were only pawns in the PMO’s game?

I ask again when that pivotal point was in our federal politics when anger, frustration, fear, and reality converged and people thought that Prime Minister Harper should retire. Can anyone answer that question?

Garfield Marks

Red Deer

Just Posted

Alberta is now below 3,000 active cases of COVID-19, as the province reported 2,639 Wednesday. (NIAID-RML via AP)
Red Deer below 100 active COVID-19 cases for first time since March

69.7 per cent of Albertans 12 and over have at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine

Premier Jason Kenney says the provincial government is doing everything it can to encourage Albertans to get vaccinated. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Travel prizes added to Alberta’s vaccine lottery

More than 40 travel rewards available for those who are fully vaccinated

Three calves were recently shot dead in Lacombe County near Mirror. (Photo from Facebook)
Calves shot and left for dead in central Alberta

Bashaw RCMP investigating three shootings

(Advocate file photo)
Red Deer down to 102 active COVID-19 cases

Central zone has 332 cases with 26 in hospital and five in ICU

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

A vial containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a vaccination site in Marcq en Baroeul, outside Lille, northern France, Saturday, March 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Michel Spingler
mRNA vaccines ‘preferred’ for all Canadians, including as 2nd dose after AstraZeneca: NACI

New recommendations prioritizes Pfizer, Moderna in almost all cases

House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., center left, reaches over to Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., joined by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., center, and members of the Congressional Black Caucus as they celebrate the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act that creates a new federal holiday to commemorate June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people after the Civil War, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, June 17, 2021. It’s the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday

New American stat marks the nation’s end of slavery

A screenshot of the First Peoples Cultural Councils First Peoples’ Map. (First Peoples Cultural Council)
Online resource blends B.C.-Alberta’s Indigenous languages, art and culture

Advisor says initiative supports the urgent need to preserve Indigenous languages

A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Report calls for airlines to refund passengers for flights halted due to COVID-19

Conclusion: federal help should be on the condition airlines immediately refund Canadian travellers

Green party Leader Annamie Paul speaks during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Paul has survived another day of party strife after a planned ouster shifted course, leaving her with a tenuous grip on power ahead of a likely federal election this year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Green Leader Annamie Paul blasts ‘racist,’ ‘sexist’ party execs who sought ouster

Fallout has continued, with two of the federal council’s members resigning

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and U.S President Joe Biden shake hands during their meeting at the ‘Villa la Grange’ in Geneva, Switzerland in Geneva, Switzerland, Wednesday, June 16, 2021. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, Pool)
Biden says meeting with Putin not a ‘kumbaya moment’

But U.S. president asserted Russian leader is interested in improved relations, averting a Cold War

A nurse prepares a shot of the COVID-19 vaccine at the Yukon Convention Centre in Whitehorse on Wednesday, March 3, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Thomas
Vancouver couple pleads guilty to breaking Yukon COVID rules, travelling for vaccine

Chief Judge Michael Cozens agreed with a joint sentencing submission,

Most Read