Remembering 9/11

It’s difficult to believe that it’s been 13 years since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001 when terrorists

It’s difficult to believe that it’s been 13 years since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001 when terrorists slammed planes into New York City’s World Trade Centre, the Pentagon and a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

Sept. 11th remains one of those dates where people of ages recall precisely where they were when they heard the devastating news.

Nearly 3,000 people lost their lives that day, which many have described as a bleak turning point in society as well – we live with the impact of 9/11 in so many ways today. It’s one of those events in history that we will never really move on from.

As international tensions continue to currently rise, it causes one to reflect on that day even more. How far have we really come since then? It seems that people in general are more fearful these days, and it’s hard not to be when so much of the news is taken up by stories about the latest conflicts overseas.

Remnants of the attacks remain today – people in general are perhaps more suspicious, more sensitive to news of potential threats to national security. Border securities are tighter, even something relatively routine as flying is certainly more of a security hassle which is understandable and overall, much more patience is required. The screening process of even visiting the United States is far more stringent then it used to be – and there really no going back. The world of pre-9/11 will never return.

Today, the 9/11 memorial in New York City is visited by thousands every day – a testament to how impactful this event was.

The Memorial’s twin reflecting pools are each nearly an acre in size and feature the largest manmade waterfalls in the North America.

According to the Memorial web site, one of the many ways to honour those who perished in the tragedy is to observe a moment of silence at key moments, including 8:46 a.m. which is when hijackers crashed Flight 11 into floors 93 through 99 of the North Tower.

At 9:03 a.m. hijackers crashed United Airlines Flight 175 into floors 77 through 85 of the south tower. At 9:37 a.m. they also crashed American Airlines Flight 77 into the Pentagon, near Washington, D.C.

The names of every person who died in the 2001 and 1993 attacks are inscribed into bronze panels edging the Memorial pools, and it’s a powerful reminder of the largest loss of life resulting from a foreign attack on American soil and the greatest single loss of rescue personnel in American history.

Hopefully the events of 9/11 – and the loss that day represents — will never fade from our collective memory.

 

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