Sales tax a wrong step

It’s obvious the provincial government’s economic confidence has been shaken after Premier Jim Prentice openly mused

It’s obvious the provincial government’s economic confidence has been shaken after Premier Jim Prentice openly mused about reintroducing a provincial sales tax last week.

Prentice said he is open to considering a sales tax as one of the options to raise more revenue to fill the potential $7-billion gap in the coming year’s budget, created by collapsing oil prices.

To put it mildly, there is much opposition to bringing in a provincial sales tax.

As Albertans, even though Prentice is lightly throwing around the term ‘sales tax,’ we should take it very seriously and heed the discussion as a warning.

Alberta is currently the only province in all of Canada that does not have a sales tax or the Harmonized Sales Tax; however, the province is no stranger to a sales tax.

For a short period of time, our province did collect funds through a sales tax.

Alberta’s PST existed for two years until Sept. 1, 1937, when the Social Credit government revoked the tax as part of a Great-Depression era banking bill.

The sales tax, which included a fairly wide range of exemptions like food, laundry soap, lumber, bricks and cement, was implemented in 1935 by the Social Credit Party after the election. It is estimated the sales tax netted the government an average of $80,000 a month.

Recent reports from the Retail Council of Canada show raising sales taxes could hurt economic growth, while the Canadian Federation of Independent Business warns it could mean more red-tape for businesses.

“Prentice needs to pop this trial balloon before it continues to damage confidence in Alberta’s ability to keep taxes low and grow the economy,” said Wildrose Finance Critic Drew Barnes in a press release on Jan. 19. “The province clearly has a spending problem and needs to scrap its own wasteful spending before raising Albertans’ taxes.”

Barnes indicated introducing a sales tax would further be in violation of the Taxpayer Protection Act, which states a referendum must be held on whether or not to implement the tax after consulting the Legislative Assembly on the referendum question.

Either way you look at it, Albertans are in for some type of revenue increase in 2015. Other options for the PC government to consider could be user fees, reintroducing health care premiums, an overall personal income tax hike, higher taxes for the wealthy or raising energy royalties.

Perhaps the PC government should end unnecessary spending and focus on the budget. Or Prentice could call an early election and let Albertans decide


Just Posted

WATCH: AFSC unveils new CEO

Steve Blakely comes to AFSC after a 40 year career in the finance sector

Lacombe Generals take commanding lead over Stony Plain with 7-3 win

Generals will look to eliminate the Eagles Wednesday night at the Gary Moe Auto Group Sportsplex

CACHS Knights take bronze medal in 1A Provincials

Knights takes out Stirling Lakers 82-69

Generals power through Game 3, winning 7-2

Seven-game series continues Saturday in Stony Plain

WATCH: Women’s Emergency Shelter holds 24th annual fundraising dinner

About 600 women and children used the Central Alberta Women’s Emergency Shelter last year

Rebels keep home-ice dream alive with 5-2 over ‘Canes

Red Deer look to steal both games against Kootenay this weekend

Shane McPhee pleaded guilty to manslaughter in Red Deer court Monday

A trial had been scheduled to run through to April 6th

Man charged after child abandoned in cold vehicle in Calmar

33 year old Aaron Blake Wilkinson charged after two-month old found in vehicle

A frustrated Trump lashes out at special counsel Mueller

In a series of weekend tweets naming Mueller for the first time, Trump criticized the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election

Three-car pile-up on Northstar Drive and 58th Street

No injuries reported at Thursday afternoon incident

B.C. teachers’ union to ask for higher salaries to help with shortages

B.C. starting teacher salaries are $10,000 to $15,000 lower than Ontario or Alberta says B.C. Teachers’ Federation president.

Few political staffers on Parliament Hill report sexual misconduct: survey

Sixty-five of the 266 survey respondents said they had personally experienced at least one incident of sexual harassment.

Experimental pot lab sprouting cannabis-infused drinks, new edibles

Nestled inside Canopy Growth Corp.’s sprawling marijuana facility outside Ottawa is a special laboratory

Federal committee to examine human trafficking in Canada

The Commons committee plans on holding hearings in Montreal, Toronto, Edmonton and Vancouver.

Most Read