Taking action with Alberta’s Climate Leadership Plan

Called Alberta’s Climate Leadership Plan, it will, “Accelerate the transition from coal to renewable electricity sources."

While most of us were enjoying the CFL playoff game between the Edmonton Eskimos and the Calgary Stampeders, which paves the path to the Grey Cup, the Alberta Government released their climate change strategy this past Sunday.

Called ‘Alberta’s Climate Leadership Plan’, it will, “Accelerate the transition from coal to renewable electricity sources, put a price on carbon pollution for everyone and sets emission limits for the oil sands.”

Premier Rachel Notley said responding to climate change is what’s right for the future, working towards protecting jobs, health and of course, the environment.

“It will help us access new markets for our energy products and diversify our economy with renewable energy and energy efficiency technology,” she said. “We are going to do our part to address one of the world’s greatest problems. We are going to put capital to work, investing in new technologies, better efficiency, and job creating investments in green infrastructure. We are going to write a made in Alberta policy that works for our province and our industries, and keeps our capital here in Alberta.”

The plan is based off the advice gathered by the Climate Change Advisory Panel, formed this past fall. The government plans to phase out coal emissions by 2030 by replacing the existing coal electricity with renewable energy.

At face value, this plan sounds positive an attempt to show that Alberta does have it together in the environmental department on the heels of the UN climate change summit to be held in Paris in the coming week. But with it comes a new carbon tax, that may end costing Albertans for heating their homes, for power and for gasoline.

At a first look, the Wildrose Opposition said the new tax will cost Albertans jobs and more money in their pocket.

Wildrose Leader Brian Jean said the new tax will hit families the hardest by making the average family pay thousands of dollars in new taxes.

“This new carbon tax will make almost every single Alberta family poorer, while accelerated plans to shut down coal plants will lead to higher power prices and further jobs losses,” said Jean. “With at least 65,000 jobs lost and counting, this new carbon tax will raise the price of everything, and put jobs at risk across the province.”

Wildrose estimates the carbon tax will raise the cost of heating per household by $230 per year, that it will raise the power bills for homeowners and businesses and that households will be around $365 more for gasoline.

According to the provincial government, whether we like it or not, all of us have to pay the price to protect the environment and repairing our global image.

 

Just Posted

Lacombe family homeless after rental house discovered to have toxic mold

Four different types of mold found in now-condemned house

World’s Largest Lure unveiled at sneak peek in Lacombe

Public unveiling will take place on June 1st

Lacombe Big Brothers Big Sisters introduces Colby Sackett Memorial Scholarship

Scholarship given to committed Grade 12 teen mentors in the community

Lobster Dinner returns in support of Lacombe Rotary Club projects

Organizers hoping to raise $25,000 to support local, national and international projects

Northstar Drive Detour for Westview Drive & Garden Road in Lacombe

Local traffic will be maintained along Fairview Drive

VIDEO: LCHS Hair Massacure supports children’s charities

Event supports kids living with cancer

New poll suggests one-third don’t want politicians to wear religious symbols

Local politicians shouldn’t be allowed to wear hijabs, crucifixes or turbans on the job, survey suggests

Raptors fans far from home adjust plans to watch pivotal playoff game

Raptors currently lead the playoff series 3-2, and a win Saturday would vault them into NBA finals

Alberta NDP cries foul as Speaker Cooper names new legislature clerk

Shannon Dean will replace Merwan Saher as the clerk of the assembly effective immediately

‘Her life mattered:’ New trial ordered in death of Indigenous woman Cindy Gladue

In a 4-3 decision, Supreme Court said evidence about Cindy Gladue’s sexual history was mishandled

Emergency funds for High Level evacuees to start flowing by Monday

About 5,000 people in High Level and surrounding communities have been out of their homes for a week

Five takeaways from the Court of Appeal ruling on B.C.’s pipeline law

It’s unclear how many tools are left in B.C.’s toolbox to fight the project

No-vote option: Alberta legislature changing rules to allow MLAs to abstain

The changes are expected to pass, given that Kenney’s party has a majority of seats

Scheer says it would take Conservatives five years to balance budget

Scheeraccused the Liberal government of spending $79.5 billion of previously unbudgeted funds

Most Read