Quidditch community growing in western Canada

Quidditch has been gaining popularity outside of the ‘wizarding world’ of Harry Potter and is spreading into western Canada.

Quidditch has been gaining popularity outside of the ‘wizarding world’ of Harry Potter and is spreading into western Canada.

Eastern Canada has been in on the fun for over five years, but the game is still fairly new to Alberta, where three major teams are now established. These teams include the Edmonton Aurors, the Calgary Mudbloods and the Central Alberta Centaurs.

Members from these teams, as well as several other smaller teams, came together at the Abbey Master Builder Centre in Blackfalds for a round-robin style tournament last weekend.

“We have three teams in Alberta right now that are fairly well-established. We have the Central Alberta Centaurs, which is our local club. We primarily do drop-in on Tuesdays at the Collicutt Centre. We have a kids’ club in the spring and fall, and our adult club runs all year round,” said Central Alberta Quidditch captain Jillian Staniec.

Staniec started a team with her spouse and a friend of theirs and she said they have been picking up members ever since.

Along with municipal quidditch teams throughout the province there is also a provincial team called the Alberta Clippers.

“The Alberta Clippers is our provincial travel team. We went to Western Regional Championships in Moose Jaw, where we won the number one spot for Western Canada. We’ll be heading to Burnaby at the end of March to play in nationals,” Staniec said.

“This national competition will be the first time in Canada where teams across the country are playing against each other, as opposed to mostly only teams from the eastern provinces getting together. It’s the first year of a national organization, Quidditch Canada. As Quidditch Canada, we are here to organize the sport and help it grow and spread, especially across western Canada where there aren’t that many teams yet.”

Each team consists of at least seven players, both male and female. There is a seeker, who chases and catches the snitch to score points and end a game. The seeker grabs a ‘snitch’ that is attached in a near flag-football style to a person’s running shorts.

There are three chasers who are the goal scorers of the game. They use a ball called a quaffle and try to get it through hoops by throwing or kicking the ball. A keeper defends the hoops.

The team’s beaters, two per team, use something called bludgers to disrupt the game play. When a person is hit with a bludger, they must run to their home side of the pitch and touch the goal hoops.

The snitch of the game is a person who runs around with a tennis ball tucked into a sock-like piece of fabric, which is tucked into the rear waste band of a player’s shorts. Seekers attempt to grab the tennis ball to end the game.

“What I love about quidditch is that there is so much going on. There are three different types of balls, five balls on the pitch at any given time, at least 14 people in a full game – there is just so much going on,” Staniec said.

When the game is played outdoors, contact is allowed. When the game is played indoors, touch rules are practiced. Staniec stressed the fact that not every person who plays quidditch is intensely athletic or a fan of the Harry Potter franchise. She said there are always people who don’t care about the origin, only that it’s a fun game to play.

“I think the main misconception about quidditch is that you have to know about and love anything and everything to do with Harry Potter to like the sport. With the people who are here today, probably most of us do enjoy Harry Potter and things like that, but there are definitely people here who aren’t into it.

“My main hope is to get more people interested in quidditch in Central Alberta. We have options for different ages and levels. It is a lot of fun, even if it can be confusing to an audience member.”

kmendonsa@reddeerexpress.com

 

Just Posted

WATCH: CP Holiday Train rolls into Lacombe

Kelly Prescott performed for hundreds of Central Albertans

Lacombe, Red Deer snubbed from new ambulance list

Lacombe Councillor Chris Ross continues to advocate for added care in Central Alberta

Central Alberta Woodworkers showcase craft at Lacombe Memorial Centre

Guild is the latest to showcase their work at the LMC’s art exhibit

Man wearing bandanna with knife robs Lacombe Circle K

5’3” white male stole cash, cigarettes early on Dec. 4th

Lacombe Ringette Association hopes to bring pro bull riding to city

Fundraiser during Lacombe Days to help support keeping fees low

VIDEO: Light Up the Night Santa Klaus Parade brings festive joy to Lacombe

The Tim Horton’s Santa Klaus Parade in Lacombe brought thousands to the streets

Hawk Tail Brewery ready to open doors

New Rimbey business to begin operation

Central Alberta Theatre kicks off New Year with Cliffhanger

Performances run Jan. 19th through to Feb. 9th at the Black Knight Inn

Tips for managing diabetes over the Christmas season

Primary Care Network staff presented to the Central Alberta Council on Aging

Team Alberta U16 Male roster announced for 2019 Canada Winter Games

The entire Team Alberta U16 Male roster will meet for Christmas Camp in Red Deer on Dec. 19th-21st

Rebels victorious over Swift Current Broncos

New Forwards Brett Davis and Cameron Hausinger showing lots of confidence on the ice

Nuit Blanche Red Deer looking to make a comeback in 2019

Local organization is hosting a Christmas artisan market on Dec. 15th

‘LETTERKENNY Live, the Encore’ lands at the Enmax Centrium Dec. 15th

Earlier this year, the original tour took over venues across the country

One hundred and five trees of Christmas

Red Deer couple decorated 105 Christmas trees to raise money for the Central Alberta Humane Society

Most Read