Agriculture

A farmer sorts through eggs as they exit the hen barn at an egg farm in West Lincoln, Ont., on Monday, March 7, 2016. Canadian poultry and egg producers have now lost more than 1.7 million birds to a highly contagious strain of avian influenza. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Power

Canadian farmers battle avian flu as bird death toll hits 1.7 million

Alberta is the hardest hit province, with 900,000 birds dead and 23 farms affected

 

A chicken looks in the barn at Honey Brook Farm in Schuylkill Haven, Pa., on Monday, April 18, 2022. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says bird flu has been found in three more communities in Alberta. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lindsey Shuey-Republican-Herald via AP

Avian flu confirmed in 3 more Alberta communities: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Cases confirmed in Two Hills, Wainwright and Lethbridge County

 

Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Proposed cattle feedlot threatens popular but fragile Alberta lake, residents say

G&S Cattle of Ponoka, Alta., wants to pen 4,000 cattle about four kilometres west of Pigeon Lake

 

Duck breeders load ducks into a truck to bring them to a slaughterhouse at a poultry farm in Saint Aubin, southwestern France, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. France’s agriculture ministry had ordered all remaining 360,000 ducks in a key poultry-producing region slaughtered to try to stem a growing outbreak of bird flu. (AP Photo/Bob Edme)

Avian flu: Quebec duck farm says it has to kill 150,000 birds, lay off 300 staff

Company says it could take a year and several million dollars to fully restore operations

Duck breeders load ducks into a truck to bring them to a slaughterhouse at a poultry farm in Saint Aubin, southwestern France, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. France’s agriculture ministry had ordered all remaining 360,000 ducks in a key poultry-producing region slaughtered to try to stem a growing outbreak of bird flu. (AP Photo/Bob Edme)
Chickens are seen at a chicken farm that was flooded but now getting back up and running in Abbotsford, B.C., Friday, Dec. 10, 2021. Poultry farmers in British Columbia are under pressure to protect their flocks as a highly contagious strain of avian flu sweeps over North America. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. poultry farmers uniquely equipped to respond to possible avian flu

578 poultry farms in B.C., about 80 per cent of those are located in the Fraser Valley

Chickens are seen at a chicken farm that was flooded but now getting back up and running in Abbotsford, B.C., Friday, Dec. 10, 2021. Poultry farmers in British Columbia are under pressure to protect their flocks as a highly contagious strain of avian flu sweeps over North America. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. cherry farmers and other fruit growers have been challenged by weather patterns. (pixabay photo)

Cherry farmers worried by unseasonably cold temperatures in British Columbia

Helicopters being used to push much-needed warm air over crops

B.C. cherry farmers and other fruit growers have been challenged by weather patterns. (pixabay photo)
This July 6, 2016, file photo shows egg cartons displayed on a shelf at a market in San Francisco. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada says the food industry is making adjustments to maintain supplies of poultry and eggs in the face of a large outbreak of avian flu in Canada and around the world.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Jeff Chiu, File

Food industry adjusting to large outbreak of avian flu in Canada, around the world

About 260,000 birds have been euthanized or killed by the virus in Canada, a majority in Alberta

This July 6, 2016, file photo shows egg cartons displayed on a shelf at a market in San Francisco. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada says the food industry is making adjustments to maintain supplies of poultry and eggs in the face of a large outbreak of avian flu in Canada and around the world.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Jeff Chiu, File
A mink sniffs the air as he surveys the river beach in search of food, in a meadow near the village of Khatenchitsy, Belarus, northwest of Minsk, Sept. 4, 2015. A B.C. Supreme Court justice denied a request by mink farmers for interim relief that would allow them to breed the animals while their court case against the province proceeds. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Sergei Grits

B.C. court denies interim request by mink farmers ahead of their COVID-19 challenge

Judge rules province was acting in the public’s best interest in phasing out the farms

A mink sniffs the air as he surveys the river beach in search of food, in a meadow near the village of Khatenchitsy, Belarus, northwest of Minsk, Sept. 4, 2015. A B.C. Supreme Court justice denied a request by mink farmers for interim relief that would allow them to breed the animals while their court case against the province proceeds. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Sergei Grits
Saskatchewan poultry farmers have been put on alert after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed the H5 strain of avian influenza was detected there in a wild snow goose. Canadian Press photo

Poultry farmers asked to keep birds indoors after avian flu reported in Saskatchewan

Small flocks are considered high-risk for highly pathogenic avian influenza

Saskatchewan poultry farmers have been put on alert after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed the H5 strain of avian influenza was detected there in a wild snow goose. Canadian Press photo
Chickens are shown at an egg-laying chicken farm in Amritsar, India on April 17, 2018. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says bird flu has been found in Alberta poultry flocks and there are new cases in Ontario. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Aleksandra Sagan
Chickens are shown at an egg-laying chicken farm in Amritsar, India on April 17, 2018. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says bird flu has been found in Alberta poultry flocks and there are new cases in Ontario. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Aleksandra Sagan
B.C. Minister of Agriculture Lana Popham speaks during a news conference in Vancouver, on Friday July 5, 2019. The British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture says it is ending the COVID-19 quarantine program for seasonal agricultural temporary foreign workers but will keep a different program for another year to support self-isolation to curb the spread of the virus.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. ends quarantine program for temporary foreign workers, self-isolation continues

The British Columbia Agriculture Ministry says it is ending the COVID-19 quarantine…

B.C. Minister of Agriculture Lana Popham speaks during a news conference in Vancouver, on Friday July 5, 2019. The British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture says it is ending the COVID-19 quarantine program for seasonal agricultural temporary foreign workers but will keep a different program for another year to support self-isolation to curb the spread of the virus.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
British trade secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan poses for a photo after an interview in Ottawa on Wednesday, March 23, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle

Beef emerging as sticking point in free trade talks between Canada and Britain

Trade secretary says UK will not compromise on allowing hormone-treated Canadian beef into Britain

British trade secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan poses for a photo after an interview in Ottawa on Wednesday, March 23, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
(Metro)

Tips for safer farming

Tractor accidents, grain entrapment and injuries from ornery livestock are just some…

  • Mar 6, 2022
(Metro)
Rising flood waters are seen surrounding barns in Abbotsford, B.C., Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021. A recovery package is expected to be announced today for British Columbia’s agriculture industry after devastating floods last November. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Governments to announce recovery plan for B.C. agriculture industry after floods

Announcement billed as the largest recovery program for the sector in the province’s history

Rising flood waters are seen surrounding barns in Abbotsford, B.C., Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021. A recovery package is expected to be announced today for British Columbia’s agriculture industry after devastating floods last November. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Cows and their calves graze in a pasture on a farm near Cremona, Alta., Wednesday, June 26, 2019. Some Alberta cattle producers say they will run out of food for their animals this weekend, as train delays and the impacts of last summer’s drought combine to create a crisis situation on the Prairies.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canadian cattle producers desperate as feed shortage reaches crisis levels

‘I’ve never experienced where we don’t know what we’re going to feed the cattle Monday morning’

Cows and their calves graze in a pasture on a farm near Cremona, Alta., Wednesday, June 26, 2019. Some Alberta cattle producers say they will run out of food for their animals this weekend, as train delays and the impacts of last summer’s drought combine to create a crisis situation on the Prairies.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, chats with farm owner Veronica Enright at her dairy farm in Compton, Que., Friday, Aug. 16, 2019. Arbitrators have issued their final report into U.S. complaints about how Canada is interpreting North American trade rules around dairy imports — and both countries are claiming victory. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Both sides claim victory after U.S. complaint about Canada’s dairy quota practices

Panel says Canada’s practices are ‘inconsistent’ with the commitments spelled out in the trade deal

Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, chats with farm owner Veronica Enright at her dairy farm in Compton, Que., Friday, Aug. 16, 2019. Arbitrators have issued their final report into U.S. complaints about how Canada is interpreting North American trade rules around dairy imports — and both countries are claiming victory. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Mink look out from a pen at a farm near Naestved, Denmark on Friday Nov. 6, 2020. Nova Scotia will help pay for a COVID-19 vaccine for mink, but the British Columbia government says more research is needed to determine if immunization is an option for thousands of animals that will be prohibited on farms by April 2023 as part of the province’s permanent ban of the industry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP

Nova Scotia pays for COVID-19 vaccines for mink, B.C. says no before closing industry

Nova Scotia’s vaccination program will be launched soon at five farms until the end of December

Mink look out from a pen at a farm near Naestved, Denmark on Friday Nov. 6, 2020. Nova Scotia will help pay for a COVID-19 vaccine for mink, but the British Columbia government says more research is needed to determine if immunization is an option for thousands of animals that will be prohibited on farms by April 2023 as part of the province’s permanent ban of the industry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP
(Black Press file photo)

Producers reminded to take part in Harvest Sample Program

Submit samples prior to Nov. 30

  • Sep 22, 2021
(Black Press file photo)
Cherries at Pravin Dhaliwal’s family farm in Oliver, B.C., are seen cooked on their trees, when the temperature hit a record 41.5 C in a June 2021 handout photo. Dhaliwal is trying to maintain his passion as a third-generation farmer while dealing with the reality of climate change and says farmers need more support from provincial and federal governments. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Pravin Dhaliwal

Farmers say heat wave, drought show vulnerable agricultural sector needs support

Farmers across Canada look to provincial and the federal governments for help

Cherries at Pravin Dhaliwal’s family farm in Oliver, B.C., are seen cooked on their trees, when the temperature hit a record 41.5 C in a June 2021 handout photo. Dhaliwal is trying to maintain his passion as a third-generation farmer while dealing with the reality of climate change and says farmers need more support from provincial and federal governments. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Pravin Dhaliwal
A sign hangs at an entrance to the Stanko Ranch, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, near Steamboat Springs, Colo. Members of the third, fourth and fifth generations of the Stanko family currently work on the ranch, which includes about 90 head of cattle, but Jim Stanko says due to drought conditions this year, if he can’t harvest enough hay to feed his cattle, he may need to sell off some of his herd. (AP Photo/Brittany Peterson)

As drought cuts hay crop, U.S. cattle ranchers face culling herds

Choices increasingly centered around how herds can sustain drought conditions

A sign hangs at an entrance to the Stanko Ranch, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, near Steamboat Springs, Colo. Members of the third, fourth and fifth generations of the Stanko family currently work on the ranch, which includes about 90 head of cattle, but Jim Stanko says due to drought conditions this year, if he can’t harvest enough hay to feed his cattle, he may need to sell off some of his herd. (AP Photo/Brittany Peterson)