Climate Change

A lobster boat grounded on the rocks at the wharf in Stanley Bridge, P.E.I. on September 25, 2022 after post-tropical storm Fiona. Tides are rising, sands are shifting and coastlines are crumbling. As studies warn of rising seas and accelerated erosion resulting from climate change, coastal communities in Canada are wondering what the future holds. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Brian McInnis

Climate Changed: Rising oceans, storm surges ‘disaster in slow motion’ for coasts

Seas have risen about 20 cm since the beginning of the 20th century

 

Documents are brought in for a closing plenary session at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

UN climate deal: Calamity cash, but no new emissions cuts

Fund will particularly help poorer nations who typically bear the brunt of climate disasters

 

Northern gannets soar along the cliffs of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada’s Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world’s second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

VIDEO: Climate reshapes life for tenacious gannets on Quebec isle

Warming and rising seas, extreme weather events taking toll on seabirds

 

Yukon delegates Jocelyn Joe-Strack, left, research chair in Indigenous Knowledge at Yukon University and co-lead of the Yukon First Nations Climate Action Fellowship, poses with Carissa Waugh, a fellow with the Yukon First Nations Climate Action Fellowship, for a picture at COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, in a Nov. 11, 2022, handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-

‘Big message’: Northern delegates bring Indigenous, youth perspective to COP27

N.W.T. and Yukon delegations are co-hosting a panel on climate adaptation and resiliency

Yukon delegates Jocelyn Joe-Strack, left, research chair in Indigenous Knowledge at Yukon University and co-lead of the Yukon First Nations Climate Action Fellowship, poses with Carissa Waugh, a fellow with the Yukon First Nations Climate Action Fellowship, for a picture at COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, in a Nov. 11, 2022, handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-
Jason Boberg, a member of the disability caucus and a founder of the disability climate action network SustainedAbility, speaks at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. Boberg told The Associated Press in an interview days before he departed for COP27 that he’s seen pro-disability rights language in draft text of negotiations at previous conferences, including language about funding disability rights organizations to do climate action work. But that language has been cut from final agreements at the negotiations. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
Jason Boberg, a member of the disability caucus and a founder of the disability climate action network SustainedAbility, speaks at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. Boberg told The Associated Press in an interview days before he departed for COP27 that he’s seen pro-disability rights language in draft text of negotiations at previous conferences, including language about funding disability rights organizations to do climate action work. But that language has been cut from final agreements at the negotiations. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
Sameh Shoukry, president of the COP27 climate summit, left speaks during an opening session at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Canadian delegation set to tell COP27 about oceans’ role in fighting climate change

Oceans have absorbed 90 per cent of the earth’s heat emissions so far, Canadian professor says

Sameh Shoukry, president of the COP27 climate summit, left speaks during an opening session at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
People are beginning to rethink the way they design and build homes, as climate change weighs heavier on their minds. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

VIDEO: How homebuilders and residents are adapting to a warming world

Price difference between building a regular home and a net-zero one is shrinking, B.C. architect says

People are beginning to rethink the way they design and build homes, as climate change weighs heavier on their minds. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A solar farm is pictured in Wasserleben near Wernigerode at the ‘Harz’ mountains, Germany, Thursday, July 21, 2022. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

VIDEO: Climate questions: What are the solutions?

Hundreds of potential solutions being explored

A solar farm is pictured in Wasserleben near Wernigerode at the ‘Harz’ mountains, Germany, Thursday, July 21, 2022. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)
Gold miners work in the open pit mine at Agnico-Eagle’s Meadowbank Mine facility in Meadowbank Mine, Nunavut on Wednesday, August 24, 2011. The mine is situated 75 km north of the hamlet of Baker Lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Gold miners work in the open pit mine at Agnico-Eagle’s Meadowbank Mine facility in Meadowbank Mine, Nunavut on Wednesday, August 24, 2011. The mine is situated 75 km north of the hamlet of Baker Lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Alvin First Rider, an environmental technician with Blood Tribe land management, works to build a beaver dam analog in a dry creek bed on the Kainai First Nation in southern Alberta as part of work to protect grasslands and watersheds near Stand Off, Alta., on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Climate Changed: First Nation balances Western science with traditional knowledge

One method involves mimicking the work of beavers to better control the water supply

Alvin First Rider, an environmental technician with Blood Tribe land management, works to build a beaver dam analog in a dry creek bed on the Kainai First Nation in southern Alberta as part of work to protect grasslands and watersheds near Stand Off, Alta., on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Todd McDonald, supervisor of arena and aquatic assets for the City of Winnipeg, is photographed at Eric Coy Arena in south Winnipeg, Friday, Oct.14, 2022. McDonald says it’s harder to refrigerate the rinks these days because of temperature changes. Cities are looking for more efficient ways to cool arenas. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Todd McDonald, supervisor of arena and aquatic assets for the City of Winnipeg, is photographed at Eric Coy Arena in south Winnipeg, Friday, Oct.14, 2022. McDonald says it’s harder to refrigerate the rinks these days because of temperature changes. Cities are looking for more efficient ways to cool arenas. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
B.C. Minister of Public Safety Mike Farnworth, left, and Shackan Indian Band Chief Arnie Lampreau view damage to Shackan land caused by last summer’s wildfires and November flooding west of Merritt, B.C., on Thursday, March 24, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Climate Changed: Communities on edge of catastrophe face choice of fight or flight

Some communities choose to move on, while others stay, rebuild and prepare for the next disaster

B.C. Minister of Public Safety Mike Farnworth, left, and Shackan Indian Band Chief Arnie Lampreau view damage to Shackan land caused by last summer’s wildfires and November flooding west of Merritt, B.C., on Thursday, March 24, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
FILE - A villager uses cots to save usable items after salvaging from his flood-hit home, in Jaffarabad, a district of Pakistan’s southwestern Baluchistan province, Aug. 27, 2022. he U.N. weather agency is predicting the phenomenon known as La Nina is poised to last through the end of this year, a mysterious “triple dip” — the first this century — caused by three straight years of its effect on climate patterns like drought and flooding worldwide. (AP Photo/Zahid Hussain, File)

UN weather agency predicts rare ‘triple-dip’ La Nina in 2022

La Nina often leads to more Atlantic hurricanes, less rain and more wildfires in the western United States

FILE - A villager uses cots to save usable items after salvaging from his flood-hit home, in Jaffarabad, a district of Pakistan’s southwestern Baluchistan province, Aug. 27, 2022. he U.N. weather agency is predicting the phenomenon known as La Nina is poised to last through the end of this year, a mysterious “triple dip” — the first this century — caused by three straight years of its effect on climate patterns like drought and flooding worldwide. (AP Photo/Zahid Hussain, File)
FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti of Kenia, Vanessa Nakate of Uganda and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. A group of top climate scientists say the world needs to think about the ultimate climate catastrophe, human extinction, and how possible it is. They are calling on the world’s main climate science body to look at the ultimate climate catastrophes, no matter how remotely unlikely they are. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)

Chances of climate catastrophe are ignored, scientists say

“I do not believe civilization as we know it will make it out of this century”: B.C. scientist

FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti of Kenia, Vanessa Nakate of Uganda and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. A group of top climate scientists say the world needs to think about the ultimate climate catastrophe, human extinction, and how possible it is. They are calling on the world’s main climate science body to look at the ultimate climate catastrophes, no matter how remotely unlikely they are. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
As plastic continues to pollute the ocean, Oceana Canada is calling on the government action (credit Oceana Canada/Elemental).

Plastic predicament: Federal group urges action on packaging legislation in Canada

Oceana Canada is calling on the government to reduce the amount of harmful single-use plastics

As plastic continues to pollute the ocean, Oceana Canada is calling on the government action (credit Oceana Canada/Elemental).
FILE - Wildfires burning hundreds of miles away create smoky conditions Monday, June 13, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s remarkable wildfire season includes over 530 blazes that have burned an area more than three times the size of Rhode Island, with nearly all the impacts, including dangerous breathing conditions from smoke, attributed to fires started by lightning. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

Alaska experiencing wildfires it’s never seen before

530 wildfires already recorded this year, worst of season yet to come

FILE - Wildfires burning hundreds of miles away create smoky conditions Monday, June 13, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s remarkable wildfire season includes over 530 blazes that have burned an area more than three times the size of Rhode Island, with nearly all the impacts, including dangerous breathing conditions from smoke, attributed to fires started by lightning. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Landfills and climate change increasing polar bear-human conflicts in Arctic: report

Climate change diminishing food supply for bears, while making the Arctic more hospitable for humans

A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A giant Pacific octopus shelters on a reef near Campbell River, awaiting the return of the tide. Alistair Taylor photo

Drastic fluctuations turning B.C. West Coast intertidal zone into ‘murder scene’

Rare tides, climate change occuring at a faster rate than intertidal animals can evolve or adapt to

A giant Pacific octopus shelters on a reef near Campbell River, awaiting the return of the tide. Alistair Taylor photo
People cool off at a splash pad as temperatures go above 30 celsius Wednesday, July 20, 2022 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Temperatures expected to reach or surpass 30 C in parts of B.C. and Canada

Environment Canada issues heat warnings for PEI, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec

People cool off at a splash pad as temperatures go above 30 celsius Wednesday, July 20, 2022 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
June, 2009, the plastic bag monster at the Squamish Farmer’s Market. (Photo: Adrian Jones/ Greener Footprints Society).

‘It kind of makes my heart sing:’ Advocate welcomes federal single-use plastics ban

Squamish marine scientist who took the lead on plastic bag ban is excited for change

June, 2009, the plastic bag monster at the Squamish Farmer’s Market. (Photo: Adrian Jones/ Greener Footprints Society).
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